Monday, July 16, 2018
Nanophotonics, photonics, Built-In Nanobulbs, cerebral cortex, cancer cells, nanowires, optoelectronic, solar energy, gold nanowires, Chikungunya virus, concrete, glaucoma, light-emitting diode, Proteomics, nanostructures, nickel catalyst, Ultrafast lasers, liver capsular macrophages, obesity, cancer, lignin polymer, liver capsular macrophages, Ultrafast lasers, monocyte cells, cancer treatments, antibody drug, gene mutations, quantum-entangled photons, gut microbes, skin aging, stroke, machine learning, Cloned tumors, cancer, Rare Skin Disease, terahertz lasers, silicon-nanostructure pixels, oral cancer, heart muscle cells, cancer, cancer stem cells, gastric cancer, microelectromechanical systems, data storage, silicon nanostructures, Drug delivery, cancer, muscle nuclei, Lithography, silicon nanostructures, Quantum matter, robust lattice structures, potassium ions, Photothermal therapy, Photonic devices, Optical Components, retina, allergy, immune cells, catalyst, Nanopositioning devices, mold templates, lung cancer, cytoskeletons, hepatitis b, cardiovascular disease, memory deficits, Photonics, pre-eclampsia treatment, hair loss, nanoparticles, mobile security, Fluid dynamics, MXene, Metal-assisted chemical etching, nanomedicine, Colorectal cancer, cancer therapy, liver inflammation, cancer treatment, Semiconductor lasers, zika virus, catalysts, stem cells, fetal immune system, genetic disease, liver cancer, cancer, liver cancer, RNA editing, obesity, Microcapsules, genetic disease, Piezoelectrics, cancer, magnesium alloy, Quantum materials, therapeutic antibodies, diabetes, 2D materials, lithium-ion batteries, obesity, lupus, surfactants, Sterilization, skin on chip, Magnetic Skyrmions, cyber-security, wound infections, human genetics, immune system, eczema, solar cells, Antimicrobials, joint disorder, genetics, cancer

A Silicon-Nanoparticle Photonic Waveguide

A new way to efficiently guide light at tiny scales has been demonstrated by an all-A*STAR team1. Their method, which involves lining up silicon...
Damaged Kidney Cells

Gene Therapy Method Developed to Target Damaged Kidney Cells

Gene therapy has gained momentum in the past year, following the federal government’s approval of the first such treatments for inherited retinal diseases and...
Risk of Heart Failure

Genetic Risk of Heart Failure

Heart failure is known to be more common in certain families but whether this familial transition is caused by genetic or lifestyle factors. By...
Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Gene Cluster Identification Made Easy Through Data Mining

Ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), a diverse group of biologically active bacterial molecules, have been attracting a lot of attention lately thanks...

dental implants

High-Tech Dentures: Fighting Bacteria with Nanotechnology

Vasodilating stents, “labs-on-chips” for analysis on smallest areas, 3D cell culturing systems for tissue reconstruction: microtechnology is gaining importance in the medical sector. It...

molecular clock

Molecular Clock Could Greatly Improve Smartphone Navigation

MIT researchers have developed the first molecular clock on a chip, which uses the constant, measurable rotation of molecules — when exposed to a...
brain cancer

Scientists Create Nano-Size Packets of Genetic Code Aimed at Brain Cancer ‘Seed’ Cells

In a “proof of concept” study, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully delivered nano-size packets of genetic code called microRNAs to...
cryopreserve

Nature’s Antifreeze Inspires Revolutionary Bacteria Cryopreservation Technique

Synthetic reproductions of antifreeze proteins found in polar fish can be used to cryopreserve - or ‘freeze’ – bacteria Revolutionary approach is more...
tuberculosis

How Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Escapes Death in Macrophages

The bacteria that cause the devastating disease tuberculosis have the ability to escape destruction and grow after they are engulfed by lung macrophages, the...
photodynamic therapy

KAIST to Introduce Enhanced PDT to Cure Cancer with Fewer Side Effects

A KAIST research team developed near-infrared fluorophores-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) that reduced the downside of existing PDTs. PDT is a way to cure wounds with...
diabetes

Path to Successful Diabetes Drug Trial Began with Simple Question

Anath Shalev, M.D., has bridged a gap that few biomedical researchers achieve — moving from basic lab bench research to a clinical therapy that...
nanophotonics

Lattice Vibrations Boost Photoluminescence

LMU physicists have characterized in detail the optical response of semiconducting tungsten diselenide bilayer crystals and explained their distinctive spectral signatures. Owed to their intriguing...

Breakthrough Study Shows How HIV Is Shielded from Immune Attack

A UNSW study has shown for the first time how HIV hijacks a host molecule to strengthen its protective shell and shield itself from attack. The findings...
Immunotherapy

Smart Nanoparticles Keep Immunotherapy Focused on Cancer

Immunotherapy is a highly promising and innovative approach to battling cancer that works by enlisting the body’s natural defenses to attack cancer cells. By...

Newly Discovered Properties of Ferroelectric Crystal Shed Light on Emerging Branch...

hybrid improper ferroelectrics, Crystal Vibrations, blood vessels, Natural Gas, butadiene, Metasurface, measure electrical current, solar cells, Aircraft Ice, Semiconductor, acoustic device, optical devices, Hybrid Electrolyte, electrical bistability, nanomagnets, magnetic circuits, capacitor, data storage, Transistors, Transistor, Electricity, solar cells, Ultrasound, Nucleation processes, micro robot
In ferroelectric materials the crystal structure distorts, giving rise to a spontaneously formed polarization and electric field. Because of this unique property, ferroelectrics can...

Making Nuclear Energy Safer and More Affordable

nuclear energy
In March 2011, as the disastrous accidents were unfolding at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, Xingang Zhao was contemplating his next...

Researchers Improve Conductive Property of Graphene, Advancing Promise of Solar Technology

solar technology
In 2010, the Nobel Prize in Physics went to the discoverers of graphene. A single layer of carbon atoms, graphene possesses properties that are...