Friday, August 17, 2018
machine learning

More Efficient Security for Cloud-Based Machine Learning

A novel encryption method devised by MIT researchers secures data used in online neural networks, without dramatically slowing their runtimes. This approach holds promise...
stressvideo

Can Stress Make us Sick?

We know that a lot of stress can impact our thoughts and mood. But can too much stress actually make us more likely to develop...
breast cancer

New Gene Test Could Improve Treatment of Breast Cancer

A low-cost test to more accurately predict which breast cancers are at higher risk of relapse and thus inform better treatment decisions, is being...
Plasma Switch

Protecting the Power Grid: Advanced Plasma Switch Can Make the Grid...

Inside your home and office, low-voltage alternating current (AC) powers the lights, computers and electronic devices for everyday use. But when the electricity comes...

platinum–copper single-atom alloy

Transforming Gas into Fuels with Better Alloys

Technological advances in oil and gas well stimulation over the past decade now allow for the production of natural gas from shale gas trapped...

nanofoam

Team of Researchers with FEFU Participation Developed Nanofoam for Effective Sound Insulation

A team of researchers from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), research centers of Russia and the Republic of Korea developed sound absorbing nanofoam, which...
Origami Electronics

Berkeley Engineers Develop Origami Electronics from Cheap, Foldable Paper

Using inexpensive materials, UC Berkeley engineers have fabricated foldable electronic switches and sensors directly onto paper, along with prototype generators, supercapacitors and other electronic...
Sleep deprivation

Sleep Deprivation Boosts Effects of Drugs and Furthers Chemical Dependence

Sleep deprivation has become a worldwide epidemic. Research conducted in the United States shows that the number of adults who slept six hours or less rose...
Foam fracturing

Foam Could Offer Greener Option for Petroleum Drillers

Now, Princeton researchers led by Howard Stone, the Donald R. Dixon ’69 and Elizabeth W. Dixon Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, have experimentally tested a...
colon cancer

Broccoli, Cabbage and Kale May Protect Against Colon Cancer

The early-stage mouse study, from scientists at the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London, is published in the journal Immunity. This suggests that even without genetic risk factors,...
spatial navigation

Nordic Nations, North Americans and Antipodeans Rank Top in Navigation Skills

People in Nordic countries, North America, Australia, and New Zealand have the best spatial navigational abilities, according to a new study led by UCL...
Nanomedicine

Proof-Of-Concept Technique Makes Nanoparticles Attractive for New Medications

Since the development of insulin to manage diabetes, pharmacists have longed to create an insulin pill. Past attempts have failed, because insulin does not...
obesity

Lab ‘Failure’ Leads to Potential Treatment for Obesity

Yale scientists set out to create a morbidly obese mouse. They failed miserably. What they found was much more interesting. “We created a mouse that eats...
olfactory epithelium

Scientists Uncover New Details in How Sense of Smell Develops

Dogs, known for their extraordinarily keen senses of smell, can be trained to use their sensitive sniffers to find drugs, bombs, bed bugs, missing...

Scientists Design Material That Can Store Energy like an Eagle’s Grip

flexible auxetic material
These kinds of materials are called auxetics and behave quite differently from regular materials. Instead of bulging out when squeezed, they collapse in all...

New, Greener Prospects for Steel Waste Gases

steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation
In the iron and steel industry, gaseous emissions are an unavoidable by-product of steelmaking. About 40 % of the carbon used in steelmaking leaves...

Liquid Battery Could Lead to Flexible Energy Storage

Liquid Battery
A new type of energy storage system could revolutionise energy storage and drop the charging time of electric cars from hours to seconds. In a...