Duke scientists link brains of living rats

A graphic representation of the “brainet” created by neuroscientists at Duke University, in which hundreds of hair-like microfilaments were implanted in the brains of four rats. Each filament sensed the electrical activity of nearby neurons and transmitted that activity – in the form of a mild current – to the filaments implanted in another rat’s brain.| Katie Zhuang, Nicolelis Lab, Duke University
A graphic representation of the “brainet” created by neuroscientists at Duke University, in which hundreds of hair-like microfilaments were implanted in the brains of four rats. Each filament sensed the electrical activity of nearby neurons and transmitted that activity – in the form of a mild current – to the filaments implanted in another rat’s brain.| Katie Zhuang, Nicolelis Lab, Duke University
A graphic representation of the “brainet” created by neuroscientists at Duke University, in which hundreds of hair-like microfilaments were implanted in the brains of four rats. Each filament sensed the electrical activity of nearby neurons and transmitted that activity – in the form of a mild current – to the filaments implanted in another rat’s brain.| Katie Zhuang, Nicolelis Lab, Duke University

A scientist links the brains of three lab rats and has them work together, using only electric pulses produced by their brain waves, to predict the weather.