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video

Mental Health Disorders: Risks and Resilience in Adolescence

Video: In this video you can see the regions of the brain coloured by how much they change between 14 and 24 years of age....
E. Coli Bacteria

Researchers Discover the ‘Optimism’ of E. Coli Bacteria

They were surprised to find that the bacteria had different strategies for dealing with each of the nutrient restrictions. Even more surprisingly, when carbon...
artificial synapse

If Only A.I. Had a Brain

Digital computation has rendered nearly all forms of analog computation obsolete since as far back as the 1950s. However, there is one major exception...
cereal

Why Cereal Is Better

Whether barley, wheat, maize or rice: The grass family includes all the major cereals. They are vital for feeding the world's population. Farmers produce...
hunting

Hunting Is Changing Forests, but Not as Expected

When it comes to spreading their seeds, many trees in the rainforest rely on animals, clinging to their fur or hitching a ride within...
salt

An Extra Pinch of Salt

We eat salt every day, sometimes more and sometimes less, but often too much. However, the impact of salt on intestinal bacteria has not...
climate

Microbes in the Desert – a New Archive for Climate Science

Under extreme climatic conditions only few “witnesses” of past environmental conditions endure. Pollen, for example, serving as indicators for the composition of the vegetation...
Glucose

Not Such a ‘Simple’ Sugar – Glucose May Be Important in...

Glucose – commonly referred to as a ‘simple’ sugar – may be a crucial factor in the fight against cancer and inflammatory disease after...
Urbanisation

Urbanisation costs almost five billion years of evolutionary history

At regional level, urbanisation is increasing the number of plant species, but it is also associated with a loss of evolutionary diversity All over the...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

New findings hope for cancer patients with kidney failure

Kidney dysfunction affects more than 50 per cent of all cancer patients, and is directly linked to poor survival. Despite the high occurrence, it...
magma

Forecasting magma movement through the crust

Assessing the hazard of volcanic eruptions requires knowledge on where exactly eruptive fissure will be located. Scientists from the Institut des Sciences de la...
Silver Nanowires

Improving Silver Nanowires for FTCEs with Flash Light Interactions

Flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are an essential element of flexible optoelectronics for next-generation wearable displays, augmented reality (AR), and the Internet of Things...
male hormone

Male Hormone Plays Key Role in Ovarian Development

Androgen is a steroid hormone that controls and maintains male characteristics in a wide range of animals, including humans. In chickens, androgen helps develop...
Leukaemia

Aggressive Form of Leukaemia Linked to Defective ‘Protein Factory’

Multiple myeloma (MM, also known as Kahler’s disease) is a blood cancer whereby the plasma cells in the bone marrow start proliferating malignantly. MM...
Quantum Computers

Further Improvement of Qubit Lifetime for Quantum Computers

An international team of scientists has succeeded in making further improvements to the lifetime of superconducting quantum circuits. An important prerequisite for the realization...
heart

New Discovery at Heart of Healthy Cereals

A new discovery at the University of Queensland could help reduce heart disease and boost nutrition security – the access to balanced nourishment -...
Renewable Energy

Plug In for Renewable Energy

Support for solar energy is vast. According to a 2015 Gallup poll, 79 percent of Americans want the US to put more emphasis on...
ice crystals

Answering a Longstanding Question: Why Is the Surface of Ice Wet?

“Ice is wet on its surface”: Since this phenomenon, called surface melting, was mentioned by British scientist Michael Faraday more than 150 years ago,...
snail species

Shell-swinging Snails Knock out Predators

Until now, snails were thought to protectively withdraw into their shells when attacked. However, an international research team has found a pair of snail...
supercapacitor

First Supercapacitor That Can Be Charged by Human Body Heat Developed...

Dr. Choongho Yu, Gulf Oil/Thomas A. Dietz Career Development Professor II in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Texas A&M University, and his graduate...