Saturday, September 23, 2017
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climate change

How Antarctic Ice Melt Can Be a Tipping Point for the...

Melting of Antarctica’s ice can trigger rapid warming on the other side of the planet, according to our new research which details how just...
Arctic temperature

Ancient Tree Reveals Cause of Spike in Arctic Temperature

A kauri tree preserved in a New Zealand peat swamp for 30,000 years has revealed a new mechanism that may explain how temperatures in...
climate change

Stronger Winds Heat up West Antarctic Ice Melt

New research published today in Nature Climate Change has revealed how strengthening winds on the opposite side of Antarctica, up to 6000km away, drive the high rate...
climate change

Reconciling Predictions of Climate Change

Harvard University researchers have resolved a conflict in estimates of how much the Earth will warm in response to a doubling of carbon dioxide...
ocean

Scientists Unravel the Process of Meltwater in Ocean Depths

An international team of researchers has discovered why fresh water, melted from Antarctic ice sheets, is often detected below the surface of the ocean,...
topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Abrupt Climate Change Events from the past Could Help Predict the...

There is a risk that increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels could trigger abrupt changes in the climate system — that is, changes so abrupt...
climate change

Tracking Antarctic Adaptations in Diatoms

Diatoms are a common type of photosynthetic microorganism, found in many environments from marine to soil; in the oceans, they are responsible for more...
climate change

UW Oceanographer Dropping Robotic Floats on Voyage to Antarctica

A University of Washington oceanographer is chief scientist on a voyage in the waters around Antarctica as part of a major effort to monitor...
climate change

Antarctic Ice Sheet Study Reveals 8,000-year Record of Climate Change

The Antarctic Ice Sheet has experienced much greater natural variability in the past than previously anticipated. Michael Weber Results of the study, co-authored by Michael Weber,...
global warming

Huge Impact of Global Warming on Southern Ocean

The growing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has raised average temperatures around the world, leading to global warming. More than 90% of...
topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Seeing under Antarctica’s Ice

Although scientists have been studying Antarctica for many years, most research has focused on the conditions of Antarctica as they currently are. Based on...
mercury

Scientists Identify Enzymes That Create a Highly Toxic Form of Mercury...

Researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) assisted a team from the University of Melbourne(link is external) in discovering how methylmercury enters the Antarctic...
Antarctic bird

Antarctic Bird Colonies Endangered by Agrochemicals

Researchers have confirmed the presence of organic contaminants in the blood of southern giant petrels in several colonies in the Antarctic Peninsula. Studies of...
carbon dioxide

Super-slow Circulation Allowed World’s Oceans to Store Huge Amounts of Carbon...

Using the information contained within the shells of tiny animals known as foraminifera, the researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, looked at the...
global warming

Deep, old water explains why Antarctic Ocean hasn’t warmed 

The waters surrounding Antarctica may be one of the last places to experience human-driven climate change. New research from the University of Washington and...