Wednesday, November 22, 2017
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Psoriasis

Psoriasis Severity Linked to Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on...
Metabolic Fingerprints

Metabolic Fingerprints Tell the Evolutionary History of Plants

The endemic plants of the genus Espeletia found in the páramo, a moist alpine biome unique to the northern Andes, could be the key...
Psoriasis

Severity of Psoriasis Linked to Increased Risk of Death

The more the surface area of the body is covered by psoriasis, the greater the risk of death for the patient suffering from the...
bee species

Birth of Undesirable Offspring Triggers Death of Stingless Bee Queens

Queens of stingless bee species (Meliponini) face a reproductive dilemma. If they mate with males with which they turn out to share the same...
inflammation

Finding the True Culprits Behind Inflammation

Different populations of white blood cells secrete different levels of IL-1β, a pro-inflammatory protein that normally helps the body fight off infection and injury,...
hearing loss

Large-Scale, Collaborative Effort Could Help Ease Global Hearing Loss

Rising rates of hearing loss demand better access to preventions and treatments
autism

Reviving the Dream of a Universal Autism Drug

Brain samples of autism patients have revealed widespread similarities in the regulation of gene expression — a stark contrast from the diversity of changes...
antibiotics

New Hope in the Fight Against Superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is a growing global health threat. So much so that a 2014 study commissioned by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom...
left-handedness

Dentistry research ID’s novel marker for left-handedness

Slender facial characteristic also is associated with tuberculosis, UW investigator notes
genes Hearing Recovery

Gene May Hold Key to Hearing Recovery

Researchers have discovered that a protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure.  The findings, where...
Musical perception

Musical Perception Can Predict Learning Difficulties in Children

A test that measures musical perception in children aged 6-13 years has been developed by a group of scientists from Brazil, Canada, the United...
cystic fibrosis

Genetics Reveal Mysteries of Hard-to-treat Bacterial Infection in Cystic Fibrosis

New UBC research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long...
black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Warning – You Probably Need a Digital Detox

Moby music lovers might be in quandary about what to make of his ‘These Systems Are Failing’ album and the ‘Are You Lost In...
Antarctica

UCI Researchers Map Oceanic Troughs below Ice Sheets in West Antarctica

University of California, Irvine glaciologists have uncovered large oceanic valleys beneath some of the massive glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica....
heart

Researchers Find That Electrical Function May Be Restored in Damaged Heart...

A Dalhousie Medical School researcher has discovered that scar tissue, like that caused by a heart attack, can maintain electrical function in damaged regions...
nanoroadsters

Light Drives Single-molecule Nanoroadsters

Scientists at Rice University and at the University of Graz, Austria, are driving three-wheeled, single-molecule “nanoroadsters” with light and, for the first time, seeing...
Nanoscale

Nanoscale Factories Built to Order

An A*STAR-led discovery could lead to improvements in the way drugs are delivered to the right parts of the body by uncovering the mechanisms...
elephants

Research to Keep Captive Elephants on Their Feet

New research from The University of Queensland could help elephants in captivity enjoy longer, more comfortable lives by detecting foot disease earlier. UQ School of...
rechargeable batteries, semiconductor, cancer, Brain Cancer, Leukaemia, novel supercritical lens, sand, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, cancer progression, magnetic memory, Genetic Alterations, Butterflies, cancer, gastric cancer, cancer cells, breast cancer cells, ovarian cancer

Urbanisation Affects Diets of Butterflies: NUS Study

A study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) revealed that most tropical butterflies feed on a variety of flower types,...
premature infants

Very Premature Infants: Towards Better Care

University of Leicester involved in project into infant mortality and morbidity Born too soon, very premature infants are particularly vulnerable and need appropriate care. The European...