Monday, July 16, 2018
Home Tags Uppsala University

Tag: Uppsala University

brain cell, bacteriophages, drug molecules, protein CD93, antibiotic resistance, antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

New Research Detects Brain Cell That Improves Learning

When a person with dementia forgets having just eaten dinner, it is due to hippocampus damage. In contrast, the same person can describe in...
smart electric vehicle charging

Collaborative Project to Develop Smart Electric Vehicle Charging

The aim of the project is to combine the knowledge and experience with mathematical modelling of complex systems found at Uppsala University with the...
fastest water heater

Uppsala Researchers Create World’s Fastest Water Heater

In the experiment, a micrometre-thin jet of water was shot with extremely intense and ultrashort flashes of X-rays using the Linac Coherent Light Source...
brain cell, bacteriophages, drug molecules, protein CD93, antibiotic resistance, antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

Virus Genes from City Pond Rescue Bacteria

Bacteriophages are the most numerous organisms on Earth (about1031). Every day, they infect and kill 15–30% of all bacteria in the world’s oceans. In...
brain cell, bacteriophages, drug molecules, protein CD93, antibiotic resistance, antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

Lipid “Trap” Inside Cells Reduces Drug Effectiveness

After administration, drug molecules have to travel a long way before they reach their site of action, which in many cases is located inside...
brain cell, bacteriophages, drug molecules, protein CD93, antibiotic resistance, antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

CD93 Protein Suggests New Strategy to Inhibit Cancer

Blood vessels in tumours have a different molecular composition as compared to normal vessels. This results in an abnormal function of the tumour vessels,...
Star Formation

Giant Telescope Reveals Star Formation Shortly After Big Bang

In an article in the journal Nature, an international research team reports how, using the giant ALMA and VLT telescopes, they discovered signatures of...
autism

Strong Pupillary Light Reflex in Infancy Linked to Later Autism Diagnosis

Despite being defined by symptoms in social communication, researchers are increasingly embracing the view that the earliest signs of autism may reside in more...
graphene

Researcher Develops a New Generation of Graphene

“The challenge has been to scale up graphene’s outstanding properties from nanoscale at laboratories to macro-scale at industry without degradation,” says Mamoun Taher. He...
mitochondria

Researchers Redefine the Origin of the Cellular Powerhouse

Mitochondria are essential organelles that are best known as the cell’s powerhouses, for the energy conversion reactions that fuel our cells. They have played...
long and active life

New Study Shows How to Live a Long and Active Life

When people reach a very advanced age, they tend to value an independent existence and retention of bodily functions more than absence of disease....
brain cell, bacteriophages, drug molecules, protein CD93, antibiotic resistance, antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

Small Amounts of Antibiotics Can Cause Resistance

In the present study in question, published in Nature Communications, the researchers have investigated how prolonged exposure to low levels of antibiotics contributes to...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

Combination of Medications Slows down Brain Tumours in Children

MYC is a protein that can bind to specific locations in the genome (DNA) inside the cell's nucleus and which thus controls the production...
microbial axolotl

New Study Reveals How ‘Microbial Axolotl’ Repairs Itself

Some animals, such as the axolotl salamander, can regrow new body parts in a process that involves the generation of new cells. The damaged...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

Common Drugs Affect Biomarkers for Heart Disease, Cancer, Inflammation

Antihypertensive treatment as well as lipid-lowering medication is often used for extensive periods of time, sometimes life-long, in many cases with few or none...
cancer care

Researchers Want to Take Cancer Care to the Gym

A study called Phys-Can has shown that group exercise sessions during cancer treatment increase patients’ strength and endurance and also provide social support and...
anti-viral therapy

How Viruses Use Cell Proteins to Replicate

Viruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth....
brain research

Current Brain Research on Mental Illness, Memory and Sleep

Diseases as a result of neurological damage, diseases or retardation cost society a great deal, both in suffering and money. At the Department of...
climate change

Desertification and Monsoon Climate Change Linked to Shifts in Ice Volume...

Huge areas of central China is covered by a plateau consisting of a fine grained soil type called loess – a sediment deposited here...
batteries

A Step on the Way to Lithium-Free Batteries

Smartphone and laptop batteries operate by light alkali ions shuttling back and forth between the anode and cathode. For this purpose, the rechargeable batteries...