Wednesday, April 25, 2018
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brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

Combination of Medications Slows down Brain Tumours in Children

MYC is a protein that can bind to specific locations in the genome (DNA) inside the cell's nucleus and which thus controls the production...
microbial axolotl

New Study Reveals How ‘Microbial Axolotl’ Repairs Itself

Some animals, such as the axolotl salamander, can regrow new body parts in a process that involves the generation of new cells. The damaged...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

Common Drugs Affect Biomarkers for Heart Disease, Cancer, Inflammation

Antihypertensive treatment as well as lipid-lowering medication is often used for extensive periods of time, sometimes life-long, in many cases with few or none...
cancer care

Researchers Want to Take Cancer Care to the Gym

A study called Phys-Can has shown that group exercise sessions during cancer treatment increase patients’ strength and endurance and also provide social support and...
anti-viral therapy

How Viruses Use Cell Proteins to Replicate

Viruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth....
brain research

Current Brain Research on Mental Illness, Memory and Sleep

Diseases as a result of neurological damage, diseases or retardation cost society a great deal, both in suffering and money. At the Department of...
climate change

Desertification and Monsoon Climate Change Linked to Shifts in Ice Volume...

Huge areas of central China is covered by a plateau consisting of a fine grained soil type called loess – a sediment deposited here...
batteries

A Step on the Way to Lithium-Free Batteries

Smartphone and laptop batteries operate by light alkali ions shuttling back and forth between the anode and cathode. For this purpose, the rechargeable batteries...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

New Technology for Accelerated Wound Healing Discovered

Treatment of large and chronic wounds are a high cost burden to the health care system since effective tools to accelerate healing are lacking....
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

New Method Enables High-Resolution Measurements of Magnetism

Magnetic nanostructures are used in a wide range of applications. Most notably, to store bits of data in hard drives. These structures are becoming...
silicon solar cells

New Technology Heralds Easy and Innovative Ways to Catch Rays

Solar cells have made a huge breakthrough in our society over the past 5-10 years, with a staggering 50 per cent annual market growth....
Personalised medication

Personalised Medication for Children Developed with New Technology

Medication for severely ill children with, for example, cancer or neurological disease are often not tailored – either dosage or appearance – for young...
giant star

Super-Sharp Images Show Gigantic Bubbles on Surface of Cold Giant Star

Until recently, the sun was the only star whose surface could be studied in detail. All other stars are so far away that they...
antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

Report Suggests New Ecosystem Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

The World Health Organization (WHO) has deemed antibiotic resistance to be one of the three greatest threats to human health today, as bacteria become...
autism

Reduced Attention to Audiovisual Synchrony Predicts Autism

An ability to integrate information from different sensory modalities is important for infants’ development and for their perception of the environment. In the new...
algorithms

The Algorithms of Our Future Thinking Machines

It has been almost a year since IT researchers at Uppsala University and KTH received 24 million kronor from the Swedish Research Council for...
antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

New Method to Stop Cells Dividing Could Help Fight Cancer

Turning off enzymes that are important for the survival of growing cells is a promising strategy to fight cancer. But to be able to...
sensor

Sensors to Make Waste Management More Climate-Friendly

Shen Leslie is studying nanobiotechnology at Uppsala University and has won theCleanTech Challenge, a competition organised by Uppsala Municipality and Uppsala University. Now he is...
antibiotic resistance, cancer, melanoma, anti myeloma, Obsessive-compulsive disorder, paper battery, genetic, Brain tumours, sperm, epigenetic, Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, genes, solar power, colorectal cancer, epigenetic , dementia, brain treatments, glioblastoma, bladder cancer, Genetic, tumours metastasise, cultured cells, HIV and MDR-TB, magnetic materials, blood test results, Genetics, brain tumour, sleep, motor skills, Chameleonic, gut microbiota, genes, pollutants, penicillin, brain tumours, aneurysms

New Dissertation on the Treatment of Malignant Melanoma

If malignant melanoma has spread, the prognosis is not good. That is why it is imperative to develop better treatment strategies. One new treatment...
carcinomas, coronavirus, Diuretic therapy, type 1 diabetes, brain disorders, asthma, Red Blood Cells, sleep apnea, Induced labor, genome editing, Iodine deficiency, surgical pain, food allergies, Zika virus vaccine, mental illness, stroke, obesity, river blindness, malaria, Parkinson’s, gestational diabetes, skin color, HIV vaccine, Kidney Stones, Parkinson’s disease, retinal vein, obesity, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, thyroid, malaria vaccine, HIV, Cushing Syndrome, pregnancy, sports concussions, obesity, HIV-infected people, dust mite allergies, HIV infections, COPD patients, wound healing

NIH Study of WWII Evacuees Suggests Mental Illness May Be Passed...

Mental illness associated with early childhood adversity may be passed from generation to generation, according to a study of adults whose parents evacuated Finland...