Saturday, February 23, 2019

LATEST NEWS

Quantum dots

Quantum Dots Can Spit out Clone-Like Photons

In the global quest to develop practical computing and communications devices based on the principles of quantum physics, one potentially useful component...
human brain

Are Human Brains Unique?

Research by Dr Ben Fulcher finds that 'lower animal' brains have the same specialised structures as humans. New research...
quantum technology

Exploring the Global Landscape of Quantum Technology Research

Leading quantum technology experts from around the world have explored their respective regional and national goals for the future of the field,...
bone-marrow transplants

Toward Safer Bone-Marrow Transplants

Blood stem cell transplants — also known as bone-marrow transplants — can cure many blood, immune, autoimmune, and metabolic disorders, from leukemia...
quantum memory device

Physicists Get Thousands of Semiconductor Nuclei to Do ‘Quantum Dances’ in Unison

A team of Cambridge researchers have found a way to control the sea of nuclei in semiconductor quantum dots so they can...
blood test for pain

IU School of Medicine Makes Breakthrough Toward Developing Blood Test for Pain

A breakthrough test developed by Indiana University School of Medicine researchers to measure pain in patients could help stem the tide of...
bionic hand

A Prosthetic That Restores the Sense of Where Your Hand Is

The next-generation bionic hand, developed by researchers from EPFL, the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa and the A. Gemelli University...
Infection biology

What Makes Helicobacter so Adaptable?

The cosmopolitan bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which colonizes the mammalian gastrointestinal system, is responsible for one of the most common microbial infections in...
batteries

New Theory Could Lead to Better Batteries, Fuel Cells

A new theory could enable researchers and industry to tune and improve the performance of a material called ionic ceramics in rechargeable...
Machine learning

Machine Learning Reveals Hidden Turtle Pattern in Quantum Fireworks

Two years ago, physicists at the University of Chicago were greeted with fireworks—atoms shooting out in jets—when they discovered a new form...
robotic sensor

New Sensor Technology Can Diagnose Reproductive Health Problems in Real-Time

The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong, can be used to measure hormones that affect...
Bird flu

Bird Flu Shuffle Probes Viral Compatibility

When influenza viruses that infect birds and humans meet in the same cell, they can shuffle their genomes and produce new strains...
quantum

NIST Physicists ‘Flash-freeze’ Crystal of 150 Ions

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have “flash-frozen” a flat crystal of 150 beryllium ions (electrically charged atoms),...
exercise

The New Exercise Trend That Is Made for Everyone

From washing the car to climbing stairs or carrying groceries, each of these activities is an opportunity for short sharp bursts of...
spintronics

Development of Nonvolatile Spintronics-Based 50μW Microcontroller Unit Operating at 200mhz

Researchers at Tohoku University have announced the development of a nonvolatile microcontroller unit (MCU) which achieves both high performance and ultra-low power...
Pollen Grains

Nature Prefers Asymmetrical Pollen Grains, Study Finds

It’s no secret that pollen plays a vital role in plant reproduction worldwide, including the production of food. But for decades, scientists...
batteries

Electric Car Batteries Inspire Safer, Cheaper Way to Manufacture Compounds Used in Medicines

Recent advances in battery technology, from the engineering of their cases to the electrochemistry that takes place inside them, has enabled the...
Bipolar Disorder

Exploring the DNA of Bipolar Disorder

A new research project led by researchers in Dalhousie University’s Department of Psychiatry will explore the genetic...
fuel cells

‘Goldilocks’ Thinking to Cut Cost of Fuel Cells in Electric Vehicles

The 2019 Toyota Mirai electric vehicle touts zero emissions, thanks to a fuel cell that runs on hydrogen instead of gasoline. But the Mirai...
Cocaine Addiction

Cocaine Addiction Linked to Increased Number of Specific Brain Neurons, Rutgers Study Finds

Rutgers researchers have discovered a connection between cocaine addiction and the number of neurons that produce orexin, a neurotransmitter that regulates sleep...
Laser physics

Transformation Through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of how C60 carbon molecules react to extremely short pulses of intense infrared light.
cell stress

Investigating Cell Stress for Better Health – and Better Beer

​Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress – even microorganisms can be affected. Now, researchers from Chalmers University...
clean water

Argonne Addresses Obstacles to Clean Water for All

“There’s essentially nothing you can make without water,” notes Seth Darling. Darling is among a large group of researchers...
spinal cord

This Eel-Like Animal Can Regrow a Severed Spinal Cord—Twice

Spontaneous recovery from spinal cord injury is almost unheard of in humans and other mammals, but many vertebrates fare better. The eel-like...
human immunodeficiency virus

Engineered Immune Cells Produce Antibodies to Fight HIV

Scripps Research scientists have successfully re-engineered human B cells to produce antibodies that can neutralize, or disable, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The...
osteoporosis

The Delicate Balance of Treating Growing but Brittle Bones

Osteoporosis is a medical condition that causes bones to become fragile and brittle. It is a major health problem worldwide, mainly affecting...
microbes

Unusual Microbes from the Deep-Sea Hold Clues to Early Life

A study has revealed how a group of deep-sea microbes provides clues to the evolution of life on Earth, in a recent...
self-driving mind

Why Boredom Is Good for Your Brain

When Prof. Sendhil Mullainathan was a young man, he would take long bus rides in upstate New York from Ithaca to Rochester to...
planet

Better to Dry a Rocky Planet Before Use

Earth’s solid surface and clement climate may be in part due to a massive star in the birth environment of the Sun....
bipolar disorder

Database Funded to Help Researchers Understand the Effect of Bipolar Disorder Throughout Adult Life...

Not much is known about how bipolar disorder (BD) affects people throughout their lives. Do women and men differ in the severity...
Internet of Things (IoT) devices

Rice U. Researchers Unveil Internet of Things Security Feature

Rice University integrated circuit (IC) designers are at Silicon Valley’s premier chip-design conference to unveil technology that is 10 times more reliable...
Melanoma tumors

Study Finds Melanoma Brain Metastases Are Immunosuppressive with Treatment-Resistant Metabolism

Melanoma tumors that have spread to the brain are equipped to thwart immunotherapies and targeted therapies that succeed against tumors growing in...
vitamin D deficiency

Potential Link Between Vitamin D Deficiency and Loss of Brain Plasticity

University of Queensland research may explain why vitamin D is vital for brain health, and how deficiency leads to disorders including depression...
3D-printed mechanical logic gates

Researchers Look to Computing’s past to Unlock 3D-Printed Mechanical Logic Gates for the Future

Taking a page from the past, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists and engineers are combining mechanical computing with 3D printing as part...
Dietary Fiber

Dietary Fiber Helps Clump Material in Your Gut

Food, microbes, and medicine all clump together as they move through our gut. Sticky molecules secreted into our intestines bind the gut...
topological quantum

New Measurement Technique for Topological Quantum Systems

Researchers at Universität Hamburg have demonstrated a new scheme for measuring the topological index of a system. The index describes the topological...
Cancer Immunotherapy

New Machine Learning Technique Rapidly Analyzes Nanomedicines for Cancer Immunotherapy

With their ability to treat a wide a variety of diseases, spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) are poised to revolutionize medicine. But before...
ultra-low-power atomic clock

Tinier and Less Power-Hungry Quantum Atomic Clock Push Toward Intelligent IoT

Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Ricoh co. and The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock...
Biodiversity

Skyglow over Key Wildlife Areas

The study, by the University of Exeter and Birdlife International, focussed on “skyglow” – light scattered and reflected into the atmosphere that...
artificial intelligence

AI May Be Better for Detecting Radar Signals, Facilitating Spectrum Sharing

When vacationers buy a stake in a beachfront timeshare, they decide in advance who gets to use the property when. The National...
Arctic fishes

Study of Arctic Fishes Reveals the Birth of a Gene – from ‘Junk’

Though separated by a world of ocean, and unrelated to each other, two fish groups – one in the Arctic, the other...
Artificial Intelligence

Brain-inspired Artificial Intelligence in Robots

Research groups in KAIST, the University of Cambridge, Japan’s National Institute for Information and Communications Technology, and Google DeepMind argue that our...
Bone marrow transplants

A Bioengineered T-Cell Factory

Bone marrow transplants, also known as blood stem cell transplants, are life-saving treatments for aggressive diseases such as leukemia and infections such...
Light Absorbers

Thermally-Painted Metasurfaces Yield Perfect Light Absorbers for High-Tech Applications

Researchers have discovered that the ancient technique of heating metal to create vibrant colors creates a nanostructured surface that acts as a...
wildlife research

Moving Toward Automated Animal Identification in Wildlife Research

A new automated method to prepare digital photos for analysis will help wildlife researchers who depend on photographs to identify individual animals...
Nanowires

The Holy Grail of Nanowire Production

EPFL researchers have found a way to control and standardize the production of nanowires on silicon surfaces. This discovery could make it...
Alzheimer’s disease

‘Improbable Things Happen’

For some of us, they carry the bright blue of our grandfather’s eyes. For others they result...
Implantable pacemakers

Powering a Pacemaker with a Patient’s Heartbeat

Implantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their...
Fuel Cell Catalyst

Newly Discovered Design Rules Lead to Better Fuel Cell Catalyst

To create better batteries and fuel cells, scientists must make oxygen molecules gain and lose electrons efficiently. The reactions are frustratingly sluggish....
Membrane Proteins

New Technique Improves Folding of Membrane Proteins

Membrane proteins, part of the material that surrounds a cell, perform many essential processes, including transporting molecules in and out of cells...
Palladium Subnano Cluster

“Butterfly-Shaped” Palladium Subnano Cluster Built in 3-D

Miniaturization is the watchword of progress. Nanoscience - building structures on the scale of a few atoms - has long been at...
malaria

“Origami” Diagnostic Device Offers Affordable Malaria Diagnoses

Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of...
lung cancer

Small Cell Lung Cancer May Respond to Combination of Immunotherapy and DNA Damage Repair...

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that a combination of immune checkpoint blockade and targeted therapies that block normal DNA damage repair (DDR) achieved...
cognitive ground penetrating radar

UVM-Developed Technology Earns Smart 50 Award, Is Featured at National Smart Cities Conference

Digging a hole in most major cities – for new construction or infrastructure repair – is no minor undertaking.
climate change

“The Arctic Atmosphere Is Key to Understanding Climate Change”

This summer, 40 international scientists will participate in the GLACE expedition around Greenland in order to study the effects of climate change...
healthy cell and tissue

Clues to How Cells and Tissues Maintain Their Shape

Scientists have long pondered how the body’s tissues maintain their stiffness in the face of growth, injury, and other forces. In a...
Coral Reef

How to Flip a Coral Reef

Tropical reefs are vulnerable ecosystems, sensitive to a variety of environmental conditions and disturbances, which can change their composition from vibrant coral...
drug combinations

Simple Drug Combination Creates New Neurons from Neighboring Cells

A simple drug cocktail that converts cells that are next to damaged neurons into functional new neurons could potentially be used to...
Nanoparticles

Too Close for Comfort: Nanoparticles Need Some Space to Transfer Energy

Quickly transferring energy from one place to another—without loss—could fundamentally change solar panels and computers. Materials made from long chains of tiny...
chronic inflammation

Interaction Between Immune Factors Triggers Cancer-Promoting Chronic Inflammation

A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified interaction between two elements of the immune system as critical for the transformation...
lens-free optical system

CEA-Leti Combines Integrated Optics and Holography in Novel Lens-Free, Augmented Reality Technology

Leti, an institute of CEA-Tech, has developed a novel retinal-projection concept for augmented reality (AR) uses based on a combination of integrated...
Robots

Robots Track Moving Objects with Unprecedented Precision

A novel system developed at MIT uses RFID tags to help robots home in on moving objects with unprecedented speed and accuracy....
insomnia

Extra Shut-Eye: 2019 Innovator of the Year Aims to Cure Insomnia

A fifth-grade school teacher is at her wits’ end. Most nights it takes the woman – who is in...
solar panels

New Residential Solar Panels Deliver Record-Breaking Efficiency

The solar panels developed by startup Insolight boast an impressive 29% yield – a record for the retail market. These systems, which...
chronic diseases

Study Reveals Economic and Health Benefits of Denser Suburbs

The paper published by RMIT urban researchers in the International Journal of Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity shows there is economic and health benefit to designing...
IoT devices

An Ultra-Low-Power Frequency Synthesizer Targeted for IoT Devices: Digital PLL Achieves a Power Consumption...

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed an advanced phase-locked loop (PLL)1 frequency synthesizer that can drastically cut power consumption. This digital PLL could be...
Fatal Heart Disease

MRI Cardiac Stress Test Shows Promise at Identifying Fatal Heart Disease

The use of MRI to determine heart function has been slow to catch on, but a study from Duke Health researchers shows...
Antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial Resistance: Interventions to Reduce Antibiotics Require Tailored Approach in Developing Countries

Study led by University of Warwick examined adherence by clinicians and patients to the advice of a new blood test to assess...
implanted electrodes

Targeting Epilepsy with Electrodes on the Head

Stimulating the brain with implanted electrodes is a successful, but very drastic measure. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, Kempenhaeghe, Philips Neuro...
Human papillomavirus

New Study Shows HPV Not Likely Transmittable Through the Hand

Commonly known as HPV, Human papillomavirus is a virus that infects the skin and genital area, in many cases leading to a...
Terahertz wireless

Terahertz Wireless Makes Big Strides in Paving the Way to Technological Singularity

Hiroshima University, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, and Panasonic Corporation announced the successful development of a terahertz (THz) transceiver that...
lung cancer

Lung Cancer: Early Diagnosis Leads to Better Targeted Treatment

Each year approximately four thousand people in Sweden are diagnosed with lung cancer and nearly as many die each year from the...
graphene-based electronics

Breakthrough in the Search for Graphene-Based Electronics

For 15 years, scientists have tried to exploit the "miracle material" graphene to produce nanoscale electronics. On paper, graphene should be great...
Ice volume

Ice Volume Calculated Anew

Researchers have provided a new estimate for the glacier ice volume all around the world, excluding the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets....
placenta-on-a-chip

Engineers Develop Placenta-On-A-Chip to Study Caffeine Transport from Mother to Fetus

Engineers have used microfluidic technology to create a “placenta-on-a-chip” that models how compounds can be passed from a mother to a fetus.
light-emitting diode

Firefly-Inspired Surfaces Improve Efficiency of LED Lightbulbs

A new type of light-emitting diode lightbulb could one day light homes and reduce power bills, according to Penn State researchers who...
climate change

New Model Predicts How Ground Shipping Will Affect Future Human Health, Environment

The trucks and trains that transport goods across the United States emit gases and particles that threaten human health and the environment....
solar panels

A Flexible Future

Imagine a future in which thin, flexible solar panels cover the surfaces of cars and buildings, powering their activities. Xiaojing...
Bone marrow transplants

A Bioengineered Factory for T-Cells

Bone marrow transplants, also known as hematopoietic stem cell transplants, are life-saving treatments for aggressive diseases, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma,...
nutritional supplement

Inexpensive Supplement for Women Increases Infant Birth Size

For women in resource-poor settings, taking a certain daily nutritional supplement before conception or in early pregnancy may provide enough of a...
gestational age

Even a “Sprat” Can Thrive – on Being Born Small for Gestational Age

We were all small, newborn infants once. But some of us were perhaps too small as newborns? A child that is born...
Internet of Things

Gearing up for 5G: A Miniature, Low-Cost Transceiver for Fast, Reliable Communications

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have designed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming1 with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO2) technology. Measuring just 3 mm...
drug addictionvideo

Women’s Hormones Play Role in Drug Addiction, Higher Relapse Rates

Women’s hormonal cycles may not only make them more prone to drug addiction but also more affected by triggers that lead to...
type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Colon Removal and Increased Diabetes Risk

The large intestine hosts bacteria that help break down food and affect energy consumption and fat accumulation. It also produces hormones that...
3D Printed Sensor

NASA to Advance Unique 3D Printed Sensor Technology

A NASA technologist is taking miniaturization to the extreme. Mahmooda Sultana won funding to advance a potentially revolutionary, nanomaterial-based...
Alzheimer’s disease

One Copy of a Gene May Be Worse Than None at All

Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, and patients with one malfunctioning copy of a gene called TREM2 have...
photonic chip

In-Memory Computing Using Photonic Memory Devices

Could light be the answer to the future of more energy-efficient and faster computing? Today, our collaborative team of...
neurodevelopmental disorders

Animal Study Connects Early-Life Sleep Disruption to Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Why do babies sleep so much? It turns out, a good night’s sleep, especially early in life, can have profound implications for...
Astrocomb

NIST ‘Astrocomb’ Opens New Horizons for Planet-Hunting Telescope

The hunt for Earth-like planets, and perhaps extraterrestrial life, just got more precise, thanks to record-setting starlight measurements made possible by a...
Textiles

Textiles from Trees: What’s Old Is New Again

Two McGill chemistry professors, Theo van de Ven and Jean-Philip Lumb, have developed a new way to make textiles from cellulose, the basic building block...
livestock

Improving Resilience in Livestock

Resilience of animals means that animals can cope with changes in the environment. Researchers of Wageningen University & Research propose that resilience...
environmental issues and social inequities

How Could Degrowth Tackle Environmental Issues and Social Inequities?

The “degrowth” movement has recently picked up traction among academics and activists by advocating substantial cuts to production and consumption to address...
computer chips

Watching Electrons and Switching Bits on

Yasin Ekinci holds a slice of silicon in his hand. The interim head of the PSI Laboratory for Micro and Nanotechnology describes...
archeology

Archaeological Finds Without Digging

Shovels, brushes and dusty excavations sites? For many people this is what comes to mind when they think of archeology. But the...
blockchain

How Blockchain-Based Technology Has the Potential to Disrupt Remittances Worldwide

Every year, hundreds of millions of people worldwide send or receive money through a money transfer system or by informal channels, generating...
atmospheric radars

Argonne’s Innovative Community Software Is on Weather Scientists’ Radar

In 2015, the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) made its open-source debut. After 4years, and with contributions from 34individual editors, it is now a staple in...
nuclear structure

New Measurements of Exotic Form of Magnesium Suggest a Surprising Shape-Shift

Just over a decade ago scientists pushed magnesium atoms to new limits, jamming extra neutrons into their nuclei toward – and possibly...
brain cells, HPV infection, schizophrenia, opioid overdose, cardiovascular health, metastatic breast cancer, depression, ovarian cancer, HIV protein function, menopause, Down syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, melanoma treatment, muscular dystrophy therapies, Ezogabine treatment, hereditary angioedema, hypertension, melanoma, cervical cancer, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, anesthetic drug ketamine, Olfactory cells, Dopamine Receptors, Muscular Dystrophy, Alzheimer’s disease, Alzheimer's, brain tumors, amygdala, freezing point, brain tumors, Rett Syndrome, cardiovascular death, Chronic viral infection, folic acid, diabetes, brain function, post-traumatic stress disorder, X chromosome, Maternal Fatty Acid, chronic sciatica, preemie blindness, gliomas, breast cancer, Combination immunotherapy, prostate cancer, acute heart failure, Metastatic lymph nodes, obesity, spontaneous coronary artery dissection, movement disorder, Safe-sleep, electronic cigarettes, prostate cancer, radiation therapy, neonatal disease, chemotherapy, tumor cells, X-linked disorders, autoimmune disease, neurological disorder, transplantation, tumor cells, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Nerve-damage Disorder, Mature B Lymphocytes, Alzheimer's Disease, hepatitis c infection, depression, penicillin, Leukemia, Anti-Angiogenesis, diabetes, conversion disorder, lymphoma, kidney disease, cancer, diabetes, autism, Tourette syndrome

Mass. General Study Identifies Brain Cells That Modulate Behavioral Response to Threats

A team of investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Regenerative Medicine has identified a population of brain cells that appears to...
Energy Production

Study Suggests Environmental Regulations May Have Unintended Consequences in Energy Production

Many countries have passed environmental laws to preserve natural ecosystems. Although the regulations seem to have improved preservation efforts, they may have...
sensation of touch

Researchers Discover the Rich Neural Activity Behind the Sensation of Touch

Our hands and fingertips are amazingly sensitive to texture. We can easily distinguish coarse sandpaper from smooth glass, but we also pick...