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glassvideo

A Bench out of Glass That’s as Resistant as Steel

By combining her know-how with that of EPFL architect Alexander Wolhoff, Jagoda Cupać, doctor in civil engineering, has proven that glass can be transformed into...
supercomputers

ALCF Supercomputers Help Address LHC’s Growing Computing Needs

Particle collision experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC)—the world’s largest particle accelerator—will generate around 50 petabytes (50 million gigabytes) of data this year...
storage system

Brookhaven Lab’s Scientific Data and Computing Center Reaches 100 Petabytes of...

Imagine storing approximately 1300 years’ worth of HDTV video, nearly six million movies, or the entire written works of humankind in all languages since...
Helium

Helium: When You Must be Sure it’s Ultra-Pure

The Science The gas that makes balloons float is also vital to scientific experiments. In these experiments, natural helium (He) is purified, but it contains...
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Warmer Winters in Europe Will Be Bad News for Coral

Cold-water coral in the North Atlantic could be vulnerable to changes in large-scale weather systems due to climate change, according to researchers.These conclusions not...
protons

Shattering Protons in High-Energy Collisions Confirms Higgs Boson Production

The Science At the world’s most powerful particle physics accelerator, physicists have confirmed the existence of the Higgs boson in the highest energy proton collisions...
ATLAS detector

Physicists at Mainz University Construct Prototype for New Component of the...

One of the largest projects being undertaken at the CERN research center near Geneva – the ATLAS Experiment – is about to be upgraded....
Higgs Boson

New Results on the Higgs Boson and the Building Blocks of...

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance surpasses expectations; results confirm the Higgs particle, show "bump" appears to be a statistical fluctuation, and offer insight into quark-gluon plasma at high energies complementary to those explored at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).
Heavy Barium Nuclei

Confirmed: Heavy Barium Nuclei Prefer a Pear Shape

Cutting-edge experiment with a beam of radioactive barium ions provides direct evidence of nuclear pear-shape deformation.
Physicists

LHC Reboot Promises Piles of New Data for Duke Physicists

Undeterred by a recent weasel incursion, CERN announced last week that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back up and running for the 2016 season, smashing protons together...
Large Hadron Collider

Large Hadron Collider prepares to deliver six times the data

After months of winter hibernation, the Large Hadron Collider is once again smashing protons and taking data. The LHC will run around the clock for...
CERN

CERN: Too quiet to hear a particle drop

Since 25 March 2016 the LHC has quietly been sending bunches of particles back into the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam pipe. Last week, due...