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ChainedLineage

Fujitsu Develops Technology to Improve Reliability of Data Distribution Across Industries

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced that it has developed "ChainedLineage," a blockchain extension technology that enables the safe use of data obtained from a...
Kinematics

New Kinematics for Milling – Customized, High-Precision Manufacturing

Manufacturers generally must offer high-quality products at low prices in order to remain competitive. Three Fraunhofer Institutes are therefore working on the next generation...
lyophilization

Purdue Research Hub to Transform Freeze-Drying Process Used to Make Lifesaving...

Purdue University researchers and industry leaders are teaming up to transform the freeze-drying process, formally known as lyophilization, used to make everything from lifesaving...
nanotubes

Touchy Nanotubes Work Better When Clean

Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, and scientists at Rice...
Cardiovascular Disease

New NIST Tool Aims to Improve Accuracy of Test to Determine...

Cardiovascular disease caused one out of three deaths(link is external) in the United States in 2016, and for decades it has been the leading...
artificial intelligence, 5G Mobile Technology, methane hydrate

Researchers Use Novel Microreactor to Study Formation of Methane Hydrate, an...

Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering are using a novel means of studying how methane and water form methane hydrate that allows...
Fingerprint

Component Tracking Solution via “Fingerprint“

Highly interconnected manufacturing chains, cost issues and technical feasibility make it difficult to trace individual components in mass production. Efficient “track & trace“ solutions...
biologics

Speeding up Quality Control for Biologics

Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other...
Fingerprints

So You Think You Can Secure Your Mobile Phone with a...

No two people are believed to have identical fingerprints, but researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and Michigan State University...
adsorbent

Adsorbent That Can Selectively Remove Water Contaminants

Professor Cafer T. Yavuz and his team at the Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water, and Sustainability (EEWS) have developed an adsorbent that can...
concrete

A Unique Additive for the Ideal Concrete

Soon all it will take is a single step for manufacturers to set the properties of construction materials during preparation and improve their properties...
desalination

Batch Desalination Configuration Bests Standard Reverse Osmosis Approach

With water scarcity affecting nearly 2 billion people — many of whom live near the oceans — “water, water everywhere and not a drop...
miniature organs

Taking Miniature Organs from Lab to Clinic

Organoids are miniature organs that can be grown in the lab from a person’s stem cells. They can be used to model diseases, and in...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

New Sensory Tool Gives Industry Food for Thought

The EU-funded MUSE-TECH project has developed an innovative new system to monitor industrial food processing in real time by combining three different sensors into...
climate change, supersomputers, supercomputers, supercomputer, Virtual Machine, lung diseases, Circuit, database integration, Lithium-Ion Batteries, Piezoelectric Device, In-Memory Deduplication, wavelength, genomic medicine, machine learning technology, Quantum Computers

Fujitsu and Fraunhofer HHI Develop First-Ever Simultaneous Wavelength Conversion Technology with...

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. and the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI today announced the development of a new method to simultaneously convert the wavelengths of...
microsize QR

A Tiny Answer to a Big Problem

The counterfeit drug industry is thriving. Criminals are cashing in on an estimated $200 billion in profits – nearly 10 percent of pharmaceuticals worldwide...
cern

CMS releases new batch of LHC open data

The CMS collaboration has made 300 TB of high-quality data from the LHC available to the public through the CERN Open Data Portal. The collision data come in...
hydroxide microflowers

Beautiful images of erbium hydroxide microflowers, Er2CO3(OH)2

As part of a collaboration between the Butler group in Department of Chemistry and the Kozinskli group in the Department of Mining and Materials...
oven

Innovative oven technology set to transform the European baking industry

An EU-funded project has developed three prototype ovens that will reduce energy consumption and save time during the baking process.
tardigrade

Scientists revive microscopic tardigrade after 30 years of deep freeze

Researchers in Japan have successfully revived a microscopic creature called a tardigrade (informally known as a ‘water bear’) that has been kept frozen for 30 years. Until this new record was set, the previous interval between freezing and reviving a tardigrade had only been nine years.