Wednesday, October 16, 2019
Home Tags Boosts

Tag: boosts

Mini solar factory

Mini Solar Factory Now Also Works When It’s Cloudy

Using sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven...
brain stimulation

Research from Sandia shows brain stimulation during training boosts performance

Your Saturday Salsa club or Introductory Italian class might be even better for you than you thought. According to Sandia National Laboratories cognitive scientist Mike...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

A Green, Efficient Alternative to Fracking That Can Prevent Earthquakes

Octopus Completions strongly believes in its technology, which they think ‘will lead to the development of an economical, fast and environmentally sustainable alternative to...
hormone oxytocin

How Dads Bond with Toddlers: Brain Scans Link Oxytocin to Paternal...

Fathers given boosts of the hormone oxytocin show increased activity in brain regions associated with reward and empathy when viewing photos of their toddlers,...
pollutants

Nanostructured Coatings Take a Bite out of Pollutants

As one of the primary components of rust, iron hydroxides normally pose corrosive risks to health. An A*STAR team has found a way to...
brainvideo

Hormone Can Enhance Brain Activity Associated with Love and Sex

The scientists behind the early-stage study, from Imperial College London, are now keen to explore whether kisspeptin could play a part in treating some...
diagnostic chip

A Modular Valve Simplifies Diagnostic Chip Fabrication

Swapping delicate microscopic flow valves for a universal modular valve system has enabled A*STAR researchers to dramatically decrease the cost and complexity of microfluidic...
concrete

A Unique Additive for the Ideal Concrete

Soon all it will take is a single step for manufacturers to set the properties of construction materials during preparation and improve their properties...
fungus

With a Little Help from My Fungus

Plants are constantly challenged by hungry animals and infectious microbes. For tomato plants, major enemies are nematodes of the species Meloidogyne incognita. These are...
Megadrought

Megadrought risks soar as atmosphere warms in Southwest

As a consequence of a warming Earth, the risk of a megadrought – one that lasts more than 35 years – in the American...
Lasers

HKUST Develops Tiny Lasers That Opens New Era for Light-based Computing

Researchers at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have fabricated microscopically-small lasers directly on silicon, enabling the future-generation microprocessors to run...
cancer risk

Why Working the Night Shift Can Pose a Cancer Risk

A handful of large studies of cancer risk factors have found that working the night shift, as nearly 15 percent of Americans do, boosts...
stem

Parity still far-off goal for women academics in STEM fields

Molecular biologist Carol Greider got a call at 5 a.m. one day in 2009 saying she had won the Nobel Prize in medicine. She...
Micro-thruster

Micro-thruster test stand paper boosts UAH graduate student to AIAA award

Amit Patel, left, and advisor Dr. Jason Cassibry with Patel’s magnetically levitated micro-thruster test stand at UAH’s Johnson Research Center. A research paper describing a...
helium, solar cell, blood cancers, breast cancer, SIRT5, gut bacteria, stem cells, cancer, improved connectivity, enzyme sirtuin 6, prostate cancer, brain cancers, lithium-air fuel cell

Cornell-Swiss study reveals a ‘sirtuin’ way to a healthy heart

The human heart is a remarkable muscle, beating more than 2 billion times over the average life span. But the heart’s efficiency can decrease over...
fusion

Mira supercomputer simulations give a new “edge” to fusion research

Using Mira, physicists from Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory uncovered a new understanding about electron behavior in edge plasma. Based on this discovery, improvements were made to a well-known analytical formula that could enhance predictions of and, ultimately, increase fusion power efficiency.