Wednesday, June 19, 2019
Home Tags Carbon nanotubes

Tag: carbon nanotubes

carbon nanotube

Cryptography gets a boost with nanotechnology

How carbon nanotubes’ purity and positioning imperfections hold the key to new advances in cryptography 
carbon nanotubes

Nano-coating makes coaxial cables lighter

Rice University scientists replace metal with carbon nanotubes for aerospace use
carbon nanotubes

Microwaved nanotubes come up clean

Rice, Swansea scientists use household oven to help decontaminate carbon nanotubes
materials

Opinion: Harder than diamond: have scientists really found something tougher than...

Paul Coxon (Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy) discusses the materials that have each been heralded as the new “world’s hardest material”.Ask most people what...
blood clotting

Synthetic antibody detects proteins

Research could lead to nanosensors that recognize fibrinogen, insulin, or other biomarkers.
graphene

Nano-hybrid materials create magnetic effect

Rice, Montreal Polytechnic study details electromagnetic properties of graphene-boron nitride materials
carbon nanotubes

New device uses carbon nanotubes to snag molecules

Engineers at MIT have devised a new technique for trapping hard-to-detect molecules, using forests of carbon nanotubes. The team modified a simple microfluidic channel with...

Are cars nanotube factories on wheels?

Rice University scientists working with colleagues in France have detected the presence of man-made carbon nanotubes in cells extracted from the airways of Parisian...

Researchers Grow Nanocircuitry with Semiconducting Graphene Nanoribbons

In a development that could revolutionize electronic ciruitry, a research team from the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW) and the U.S. Department of...

IBM Research Breakthrough Paves Way for Post-Silicon Future with Carbon Nanotube...

IBM Research today announced a major engineering breakthrough that could accelerate carbon nanotubes replacing silicon transistors to power future computing technologies.IBM scientists demonstrated a new way to...

First Optical Rectenna – Combined Rectifier and Antenna – Converts Light...

Using nanometer-scale components, researchers have demonstrated the first optical rectenna, a device that combines the functions of an antenna and a rectifier diode to...

Realizing Carbon Nanotube Integrated Circuits

Individual transistors made from carbon nanotubes are faster and more energy efficient than those made from other materials. Going from a single transistor to...

Tiny wires could provide a big energy boost 

Wearable electronic devices for health and fitness monitoring are a rapidly growing area of consumer electronics; one of their biggest limitations is the capacity...

IBM’s Virtual Supercomputer Finds Clean Water Clue

According to a paper published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, scientists discovered a phenomenon in which the use of carbon nanotubes, under specific conditions,...

Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3D

Paul Gatenholm, professor in Polymer TA group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely...

Researchers grind nanotubes to get nanoribbons

A simple way to turn carbon nanotubes into valuable graphene nanoribbons may be to grind them, according to research led by Rice University. The trick, said Rice...

Stanford team combines logic, memory to build a high-rise chip

Stanford researchers are building layers of logic and memory into skyscraper chips that are smaller, faster, cheaper – and taller.

Detecting gases wirelessly and cheaply

MIT chemists have devised a new way to wirelessly detect hazardous gases and environmental pollutants, using a simple sensor that can be read by...

Carbonics, spinoff of UCLA’s CNSI Incubator, launches with $5.5 million investment

A spinoff from research centers at UCLA and USC has become a standalone company, thanks to a $5.5 million investment from TAQNIA International.The firm,...

Special UO microscope captures defects in nanotubes

University of Oregon chemists provide a detailed view of traps that disrupt energy flow, possibly pointing toward improved charge-carrying devices