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influenza virus infections

Tethered Antibodies Present a Potential New Approach to Prevent Influenza Virus...

As co-leaders of an international collaboration, scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that tethering four antibodies together may be an effective strategy for neutralizing...
superconductorsvideo

Lighter Windmills Thanks to Superconductivity

It is a windmill on the Danish coast at Thyborøn that is the world’s first: recently the conventional electrical generator, with permanent magnets, was...
topological insulator

A Physics Treasure Hidden in a Wallpaper Pattern

“The beauty of topology is that one can apply symmetry principles to find and categorize materials,” said B. Andrei Bernevig, a professor of physics at Princeton.The research,...
nanocrystal

Researchers Show Thermally Activated Delayed Photoluminescence from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that the transfer of triplet excitons from nanomaterials to molecules also creates a feedback mechanism that...
methane

Bridging the Gap

As we work to toward more sustainable ways of powering our lifestyles, there is a quest to bridge the gap between the carbon dioxide-emitting...
batteries

Making Lithium-Ion Batteries Safer, Stronger

Today’s rechargeable lithium-ion batteries are good, but they could be much better in the future.That’s what University of Illinois at Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory...
DNA toxin

Deciphering Potent DNA Toxin’s Secrets

One of the most potent toxins known acts by welding the two strands of the famous double helix together in a unique fashion which...
stem cell

New Technology to Manipulate Cells Could One Day Help Treat Parkinson’s,...

A groundbreaking advancement in materials from Northwestern University could potentially help patients requiring stem cell therapies for spinal cord injuries, stroke, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s...
tweezers

Physicists Use Numerical ‘Tweezers’ to Study Nuclear Interactions

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed numerical “tweezers” that can pin a nucleus in place, enabling them to...
Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Study Offers New Hope for Asthma Sufferers

According to the European Lung Foundation, adult asthma causes on-going symptoms of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing. These symptoms can occur any time,...
Fusion Reactors

UMD Physicist Improves Method for Designing Experimental Fusion Reactors

Development of nuclear fusion—the process that powers stars—into a viable source for energy on Earth remains far in the future. However, a new software...
genome, human disease, brain injuries

Baylor Researchers Develop Hybrid Computational Strategy for Scalable Whole Genome Data...

Human genome sequencing costs have dropped precipitously over the last few years, however the analytical ability to meet the growing demand for making sense...
Batteries

Chemists Offer Enhanced 3D Look Inside Batteries

A team of chemists has developed a method to yield highly detailed, three-dimensional images of the insides of batteries. The technique, based on magnetic...
topological insulators

Defects, Electrons, and a Long-Standing Controversy

Scientists explain diverse results around a material that is both insulator and conductor and offer chemical roadmap to harness it.
Visible lasers

The Controlling Light

Visible lasers offer exquisite control of x-ray light in a tabletop apparatus, potentially providing access to new insights to chemical reactions, proteins, and even atoms’ inner workings.
Ferroelectric

Penn Chemists Establish Fundamentals of Ferroelectric Materials 

Ferromagnetic materials, like compass needles, are useful because their magnetic polarization makes them rotate to align with magnetic fields. Ferroelectric materials behave in a...
Electron Microscope Detector

New High-Capability Solid-State Electron Microscope Detector Enables Novel Studies of Materials

Device allows fast, precise measurements of electric and magnetic fields at the atomic level, providing insights into the next generation of electronic, energy production, and storage materials.
self-assembly

Understanding and Predicting Self-Assembly

Newly discovered “design rule” brings nature-inspired nanostructures one step closer.
synthetic biochemistry

Major advance in ‘synthetic biochemistry’ holds promise for industrial products and...

UCLA biochemists have devised a way to convert sugar into a variety of useful chemical compounds without using cells
Nanocrystal

Penn Engineers Develop First Transistors Made Entirely of Nanocrystal ‘Inks’ 

The transistor is the most fundamental building block of electronics, used to build circuits capable of amplifying electrical signals or switching them between the...