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nickel

High Quality Graphene from Nickel

A study published in Science unveils the catalytic action of nickel in the growth of graphene sheets. The research, carried out by Iom-Cnr and the University...
brain cancer

Researchers Identify Molecular Target for Brain Cancer, Develop Immunotherapy Approach to...

An international team of researchers has genetically engineered cancer-killing immune cells that can hunt brain tumors displaying a new molecular target that is highly...
mushroom

Mushrooms Are Full of Antioxidants That May Have Antiaging Potential

Mushrooms may contain unusually high amounts of two antioxidants that some scientists suggest could help fight aging and bolster health, according to a team...
gravitational wavesvideo

LIGO and Virgo Make First Detection of Gravitational Waves Produced by...

For the first time, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time -- in addition to light from the spectacular collision of...
Spider Silk

Tough Stuff: Spider Silk Enhanced with Graphene-based Materials

Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have demonstrated that graphene-based materials can be used to boost the properties of spider's silk. The silk – produced...
Terahertz Absorbers

Graphene based Terahertz Absorbers

Graphene Flagship researches from CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Italy and the University of Cambridge, UK have shown that it is possible to create a terahertz saturable...
quantum memory

First On-Chip Nanoscale Optical Quantum Memory Developed

For the first time, an international team led by engineers at Caltech has developed a computer chip with nanoscale optical quantum memory.Quantum memory stores...
plants

“Plant Cinema” Shows the Flow of Energy

Nothing works without fuel: plants also depend on fuel for growth and development. In living organisms, fuel comes as the universal energy currency adenosine...
Tetrahedronvideo

Running Light Around a Tetrahedron

The world has so far taken relatively little notice of Fürstenfeldbruck, a town located about 20 km from Munich. It certainly doesn’t rate as...
coffee beans

Drinking Coffee Reduces Risk of Death from All Causes, Study Finds

The findings come from the largest study of its kind, in which scientists analysed data from more than half a million people across 10...
graphene

Zero-Gravity: Graphene for Space Applications

Researchers and students in the Graphene Flagship are preparing for two exciting experiments in collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the...
Concrete

New Studies of Ancient Concrete Could Teach Us to Do as...

A new look inside 2,000-year-old concrete – made from volcanic ash, lime (the product of baked limestone), and seawater – has provided new clues...
supernovavideo

The Big Star That Couldn’t Become a Supernova

For the first time in history, astronomers have been able to watch as a dying star was reborn as a black hole.It went out...
dark matter

World’s Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Releases First Results

Scientists behind XENON1T, the largest dark matter experiment of its kind ever built, are encouraged by early results, describing them as the best so...
soft matter

That’s the Way Soft Matter Relaxes

The class of materials known as "soft matter" includes a wide variety of everyday products and foods from shampoo, toothpaste and shaving foam to...
electronics

Ink-Jet Printable and Biocompatible Layered Electronics

​Printed electronics can lead to both low-cost and flexible devices. Flexible electronics is of particular interest for wearable systems, such as health and fitness...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Protecting Olive Trees from a Deadly Disease

Xylella fastidiosa (XF) is a bacterium which has been linked to a number of plant diseases, particularly in the Americas where it has ravaged...
solar energy

Dream of Energy-Collecting Windows Is One Step Closer to Reality

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca are bringing the dream of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy one step...
two-dimensional materials

Breakthrough in ‘Wonder’ Materials Paves Way for Flexible Tech

Electronic devices set to become smaller, flexible and highly efficient – following University of Warwick research on 2D materials Researchers measured the electronic...
dark matter

Next-Gen Dark Matter Detector in Race to Finish

U.S.-based experiment is on a fast track to help solve science mystery.The race is on to build the most sensitive U.S.-based experiment designed to...