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unnoticed infections

Unseen Infections Harming World’s Children, New Research Reveals

Children around the world are suffering from unnoticed infections that are stunting their growth and mental development, new research from an international coalition of...
ozone air pollution

One Million Premature Deaths Linked to Ozone Air Pollution

In 2010, long-term outdoor exposure to ozone air pollution contributed to about one million premature respiratory deaths globally – approximately one in five of...
autonomous system

From Transformers to Autonomous Systems

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Edgar Lobaton, an associate professor in NC State’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. This is...
desalination

New Mexico Firm Uses Motion of the Ocean to Bring Fresh...

Hurricane Katrina whipped up huge, powerful waves that caused severe destruction in 2005 along the U.S. Gulf Coast. Their size and strength convinced Phil...
climate change

Newly-discovered Peatlands Must Be Protected to Prevent Climate Change

Recently discovered peatlands in Amazonia and Africa must be protected from commercial agriculture to prevent environmental disaster, say researchers at the University of St...
ocean

The Plankton Puzzle

The task is gigantic—Marine biologists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research Kiel (Germany), Kiel University and the Observatoire océanologique, Villefranche sur Mer...
climate change

The Effects of Melting Glaciers on Tropical Communities

A Penn State professor is researching the trickle-down effects that melting tropical glaciers have on food security and biodiversity, and what regional communities, like...
preterm birth, Motor Neurons, trauma, Celiac Disease, cancer, Brain Pathway, sepsis, skin cancer, Veterans, Muscle Injuries, Regenerative Medicine, genetic variation, depression, mind-body connection, Organ Transplant, sleep habits, cancer

University of Pittsburgh Study Finds Improved Access to Care for Veterans

A recent study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business and the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, Program Evaluation and...
octopuses

Manganese Nodules as Breeding Ground for Deep-sea Octopuses

Manganese nodules on the seabed of the Pacific Ocean are an important breeding ground for deep-sea octopuses. As reported by a German-American team of...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Link Found Between El Niño and Sri Lankan Dengue Epidemics

The El Niño phenomenon is an irregularly occurring and complex series of climatic changes which has a number of important effects both across the...