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dark matter

Harvey Meyer Is Awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant for Fundamental Calculations...

Particle physicist Professor Harvey Meyer of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has received a grant from the European Research Council supporting his research on...
matter

Using Supercomputers to Delve Ever Deeper into the Building Blocks of...

Nuclear physicists are known for their atom-smashing explorations of the building blocks of visible matter. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle...
three-dimensional

Filling the Early Universe with Knots Can Explain Why the World...

The next time you come across a knotted jumble of rope or wire or yarn, ponder this: The natural tendency for things to tangle...
Sigma Meson

Researchers Seek Sigma Meson on the Path to Heavier Hadrons

Often, researchers aim for a distant horizon with respect to their research goals. When they get there, they plot their course for the next...
particle detector

Heavy Particles Get Caught Up in the Flow

By teasing out signatures of particles that decay just tenths of a millimeter from the center of a trillion-degree fireball that mimics the early...
proton collisions

LHC Detects Production of Large Quantities of Strange Particles in Proton...

In an article published on April 24 in Nature Physics, the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) international collaboration reported an abundant production of...
matter

Scientists Move Closer to Understanding Glue That Holds Matter Together

Scientists are one step closer to understanding the strong force that binds quarks together forever. Researchers working with the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF)...
Quark-gluon plasmas

New Model Deepens Understanding of the Dynamics of Quark-gluon Plasmas

Quark-gluon plasmas are among the subjects that have been most extensively researched by physicists in recent times. Thanks to the largest particle accelerators in...
primordial soup

The Roadmap to Quark Soup

Scientists discover new signposts in the quest to determine how matter from the early universe turned into the world we know today.
proton

New ALICE results show novel phenomena in proton collisions

In a paper published today in Nature Physics(link is external), the ALICE collaboration reports that proton collisions sometimes present similar patterns to those observed...
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Trending Science: CERN Announces Five New Particles Uncovered by Large Hadron...

The LHCb experiment being run by researchers at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, also known as ‘the beauty experiment’, is trying to unravel what happened...
proton

How did the Proton Get Its Spin?

Calculating a proton's spin used to be an easy college assignment. In fact, Carl Gagliardi remembers answering that question when he was a physics...
matter

sPHENIX Gets CD0 for Upgrade to Experiment Tracking the Building Blocks...

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has granted “Critical Decision-Zero” (CD-0) status to thesPHENIX project, a transformation of one of the particle detectors at...
nuclear

Theory Provides Roadmap in Quest for Quark Soup ‘Critical Point’

Thanks to a new development in nuclear physics theory, scientists exploring expanding fireballs that mimic the early universe have new signs to look for...
Subatomic

Jefferson Lab–NVIDIA Collaboration Uses Titan to Boost Subatomic Particle Research

Scientists are only beginning to understand the laws that govern the atomic world. Before the 1950s the electrons, neutrons, and protons comprising atoms were the...
plasma

Simulations Show Swirling Rings, Whirlpool-Like Structure in Subatomic ‘Soup’

At its start, the universe was a superhot melting pot that very briefly served up a particle soup resembling a “perfect,” frictionless fluid. Scientists...
Lead ion and proton

Lead Ion and Proton: Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Following seven successful months of colliding proton beams with each other in the search for new fundamental particles, the LHC today began colliding proton...
gluon

Scientists Model the “Flicker” of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

Model identifies fluctuations in the glue-like particles that bind quarks within protons as essential to explaining experimental data on proton structure
Quantum fluctuations

Quantum Fluctuations Help Solve Decade-old Puzzle

A high-energy nuclear physics puzzle that scientists have been trying to solve for ten years has just been cracked by computer simulation. The problem...
gluons

Zooming in on Gluons’ Contribution to Proton Spin

New data that "wimpy" gluons, the glue-like particles that bind quarks within protons, have a big impact on proton spin.