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Self-learning assistance

Self-Learning Assistance System for Efficient Processes

To prevent long downtimes and high quantities of scrap, manufacturers must design production processes to be stable and efficient. Particularly successful outcomes are achieved...
cellular signaling

New Player in Cellular Signaling

To survive and grow, a cell must properly assess the resources available and couple that with its growth and metabolism — a misstep in...
lipoic acid

Renewable Resource: Sulfur Is Used, Replenished to Produce Lipoic Acid

New research from Penn State shows how a protein is consumed and then reconstituted during the production of lipoic acid, a compound required by...
catalysis

UCLA, Japanese Scientists Discover New Way to Speed up Chemical Reactions

Ateam of scientists and engineers from UCLA and Japan’s University of Shizuoka has discovered a new mode of enzyme catalysis, the process that speeds...
Alzheimer’s

Drug Restores Cells and Memories in Alzheimer’s Mouse Models

A new drug can restore memories and connections between brain cells in mice with a model of Alzheimer’s disease, a new Yale-led study suggests.“The...
Enzymes

Enzymes Engineered Using Direct Evolution

Organic molecules containing a fluorine atom are widely used in the materials, agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries. However, synthesizing the carbon-fluorine bond typically utilizes toxic...
mitochondria

Protein with Multiple Duties

Freiburg researchers have discovered that the molecular barrel protein Mdm10 can carry out various functions for the development and maintenance of mitochondrial structure by...
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A Sweet Solution to the Thermal Energy Storage Problem

As scientists and researchers continue to seek new ways to reduce dependency on fossil fuels and decrease the amount of CO2 put into the...
pollutants

Environmental Stress Enhances the Effects of Pollutants

Animals and plants are simultaneously exposed to a multitude of natural and man-made ("anthropogenic") stressors. These may arise, for example, from the lack of...