Wednesday, July 17, 2019
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basking sharks

Discovering Why Basking Sharks Go to Scotland

These data have been gathered by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) and the University of Exeter as part of a new camera tagging project launched...
Smart Specialisationvideo

Sixty European Regions Get Ready to Develop Joint Energy Projects

These regions have been working since 2015 through the Smart Specialisation Platform on Energy (S3PEnergy).This European Commission platform facilitates partnerships between EU regions that...
Sea Ice

Weather Anomalies Accelerate the Melting of Sea Ice

In the winter of 2015/16, something happened that had never before been seen on this scale: at the end of December, temperatures rose above...
battery

Smart Battery for the World’s First Floating Wind Farm

Hywind Scotland, the world’s first floating wind farm, will next year be equipped with a battery to store power from the wind farm. The...
robots

New Approach Uses Light Instead of Robots to Assemble Electronic Components

An international team of researchers has developed a new light-based manipulation method that could one day be used to mass produce electronic components for...
Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding for Two Months Halves Risk of SIDS, UVA-led Study Finds

Breastfeeding for at least two months cuts a baby’s risk of sudden infant death syndrome almost in half, a sweeping new international study has...
heart disease

Statins Reduce Deaths from Heart Disease by 28 Per Cent, Says...

Previous research has shown the benefit of statins for reducing high cholesterol and coronary heart disease risk amongst different patient populations. However, until now there...
salmon

Farmed Salmon Are Deaf – and Now We Know Why

The odds are that every second farmed salmon we eat has lost much of its ability to hear.Although fish senses aren’t usually a consideration...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Tidal Energy Reaches Another Milestone

The currents of coastal tidal waters provide a source of energy, exploitable by devices which function much like submerged wind turbines. Yet owing to...
Tyrannosaurus rex

Collagen from a Tyrannosaurus Rex Bone Proves Jurassic Park Will Never...

Palaeontologists at the University of Manchester have definitively proven there will never be a Jurassic Park after re-analysing collagen from a Tyrannosaurus rex bone...
tooth erosion, Alzheimer's Disease, high blood pressure, chronic disease, Anti-ageing, pancreatic cancer

Research Suggests a New Model of Chronic Disease

Genes play a key role in determining whether someone experiences multiple chronic diseases, according to new research by King’s.Chronic pain, depression and heart disease...
Cocaine addiction

Cocaine Addiction Leads to Build-up of Iron in Brain

Given the important role that iron plays in both health and disease, iron metabolism is normally tightly regulated. Long-term cocaine use, however, seems to...
Arclightvideo

Arclight – a Medical Revolution

A revolutionary pocket-sized device which could help save the sight of millions of people around the world has been launched by a team led...
ecological invasion

An Ecological Invasion Mimics a Drunken Walk

A theory that uses the mathematics of a drunken walk describes ecological invasions better than waves, according to Tim Reluga, associate professor of mathematics...
Antarctica

Finding Antarctica in our Backyard

Policy makers and scientists recently celebrated the creation of the world’s largest marine reserve just off the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. Weddell seals,...
transportation, beacons, clever sensor device, Smart device, nanochips, type 2 diabetes, graphene, Wastewater treatment, kidney disease, cancer treatment, data transmission, sensitive robots, Photovoltaic, hydrogen mobility, genetic codes, wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Warmer Winters in Europe Will Be Bad News for Coral

Cold-water coral in the North Atlantic could be vulnerable to changes in large-scale weather systems due to climate change, according to researchers.These conclusions not...
Parkinson's

Parkinson’s Study Could Pave Way for Early Detection Test

A test that can detect Parkinson's disease in the early stages of the illness has moved a step closer.Scientists have developed a way of...
protein

Scientists Challenge Recommendation That Men with More Muscle Need More Protein

Sports nutrition recommendations may undergo a significant shift after research from the University of Stirling has found individuals with more muscle mass do not...
superconductor

Elusive superconductor state observed

A state of electronic matter first predicted by theorists in 1964 has finally been discovered by Cornell physicists and may provide key insights into...