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autonomous terrestrial robotvideo

“Robat” Uses Sound to Navigate and Map Unique Environments

The "Robat" is a fully autonomous terrestrial robot with bat-like qualities that uses echolocation to move through novel environments while mapping them based only...
smartphones

Smartphones May Be Used to Better Predict the Weather

Flash floods occur with little warning. Earlier this year, a flash flood that struck Ellicott City, MD, demolished the main street, swept away parked...
superlubricity

Microscale Superlubricity Could Pave Way for Future Improved Electromechanical Devices

Lubricity measures the reduction in mechanical friction and wear by a lubricant. These are the main causes of component failure and energy loss in...
Spinal Cord Injury

New Study Offers Hope of Recovery from Spinal Cord Injury

Spinal cord injury or damage causes permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions. Hope of recuperation is slim to none. Now a...
Dyslexia

Link Found Between Resilience to Dyslexia and Gray Matter in the...

Dyslexia, a reading disorder, is characterized by a difficulty in "decoding" — navigating between the visual form and sounds of a written language. But...
plasma ringvideo

Engineers Create Stable Plasma Ring in Open Air

Matter can exist in four distinct phases: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Plasmas are made of charged particles—ions and electrons—and occur naturally on Earth...
mammals

Mammals Switched to Daytime Activity After Dinosaur Extinction

Mammals only started being active in the daytime after non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out about 66 million years ago (mya), finds a new study...
ADHD

Eye Movements Reveal Temporal Expectation Deficits in ADHD

A technique that measures tiny movements of the eyes may help scientists better understand and perhaps eventually improve assessment of ADHD, according to newresearch...
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Studying Insects’ Response to Short Term Climate Events

The CLIMINSECTS (The effect of expected climate change on insect performance: physiology, behaviour and life history) project was born from the observation that insects...
electronic tattoo

Nanotech ‘Tattoo’ Can Map Emotions and Monitor Muscle Activity

A new temporary "electronic tattoo" developed by Tel Aviv University that can measure the activity of muscle and nerve cells for researchers is poised...
nanosubs

Nanosubs are good to glow

Rice University’s single-molecule submersibles gain better fluorescent properties for tracking
gut microbes

Do gut microbes shape our evolution?

Scientists increasingly realize the importance of gut and other microbes to our health and well-being, but one UC Berkeley biologist is asking whether these...
nervous system

Study identifies specific gene network that promotes nervous system repair

Findings by UCLA-led collaboration are an early step toward potential treatments for injuries to the central nervous system
gene expression

RNA modification discovery suggests new code for control of gene expression

A new cellular signal discovered by a team of scientists at the University of Chicago and Tel Aviv University provides a promising new lever in the control of gene expression.