Saturday, November 18, 2017
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Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry Opens up Novel Access to Important Classes of Substances

Electrochemistry has undergone a renaissance in recent years and numerous research groups are currently working on the environmentally friendly production or conversion of molecules....
Soil Carbon

The Challenge of Estimating Alaska’s Soil Carbon Stocks

The Science Predicting how carbon in the soil changes when permafrost changes isn’t easy. Alaska’s diverse terrain makes it difficult to optimize the placement of...
antibiotics

Antibiotic Discovery in the Abyss

The development of antibiotics is considered by many to be the greatest medical advancement in human history. Recently, however, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance...
e-waste

Recycling the Rare Earth Metals of E-Waste

Recycling the valuable rare earth metals found in advanced electronics from smartphones to plasma screen TVs has been a challenge for both manufacturers and...
nanocatalyst

New Photocatalyst Converts Carbon Dioxide to 99% Pure Fuel

A KAIST research team led by Professor Hyunjoon Song of the Department of Chemistry developed a metal oxide nanocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide to...
crops

One Step Closer to Crops with Twice the Yield

Led by Mark Aarts and Jeremy Harbinson, a team of scientists has shown that thale cress (a common model plant) has various genes involved...
biomass

Research is Making Plant Waste a Viable Option in Ethanol Production

UC Riverside researchers have developed a streamlined process that could finally make the ethanol production cost from abundant “second generation” plant wastes competitive with...
bio-solar panel

Wallpaper Bio-Solar Panel Developed by Researchers

Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic micro-organisms that have been on Earth for billions of years. They are thought to be the primary reason why the Earth’s...
environmental toxins

Can Environmental Toxins Disrupt the Biological “Clock”?

Can environmental toxins disrupt circadian rhythms – the biological “clock” whose disturbance is linked to chronic inflammation and a host of human disorders? Research...
dioxane

Dioxane-Chomping Microbe has Helpful Gene

Rice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that helps degrade a form of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could...
chronic disease, heart failure

Mortality Rate for People with Lupus remains Higher than U.S. Rate...

Findings While the mortality rate in the United States have declined over the past four decades, UCLA researchers found that the mortality rate for people...
heavy elements

Rules Are Only Suggestions in Heavy Elements

The Science The rules that are taught for predicting the arrangement of electrons in light elements do not apply well to heavy elements. Why? Because...
climate change

Peatland Plants Adapting Well to Climate Change, Suggests Study

They account for just three per cent of the Earth’s surface but play a major role in offsetting carbon dioxide emissions – and now...
whale

Under Pressure

When 15 North Atlantic right whales turned up dead in U.S. and Canadian waters in the summer of 2017, it was declared an unprecedented...
peat bogs

Peat Bogs Defy the Laws of Biodiversity

A team of European researchers analyzed 560 intact peat bog samples from 56 European countries to study how peat bog ecosystems respond to different...
computer server

Old Phones Get New Life in High-Powered Computer Servers

In a recent paper, graduate student Mohammad Shahrad and David Wentzlaff, an assistant professor of electrical engineering, demonstrated that it is possible to build...
Muscle Power

‘Selfish Brain’ Wins out When Competing with Muscle Power, Study Finds

A well-fuelled brain may have offered us better survival odds than well-fuelled muscles when facing an environmental challenge Danny Longman Human brains are expensive – metabolically speaking....
black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Under the Sea: Ensuring the Safety of Offshore Carbon Storage

Faced with increasing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere and oceans, scientists are developing on- and offshore carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems...
Coevolution

Understanding the Coevolving Web of Life as a Network

Coevolution, which occurs when species interact and adapt to each other, is often studied in the context of pair-wise interactions between mutually beneficial symbiotic...
plant protein, climate, Skin Disease, Form of Light, clean energy, batteries, Ascaris roundworm, inflammation, motor neurone disease, breast cancer

Plant Protein May Hold the Key to Fighting Hunger and Global...

Initial results from a collaborative EU research project suggest that diets that draw protein from plant sources may hold the key to fighting hunger...