Sunday, November 18, 2018

Is an ‘Internet of Ears’ the Next Big Thing for Smart...

Houses have been getting progressively “smarter” for decades, but the next generation of smart homes may offer what two Case Western Reserve University scientists...
ultra-thin acoustic absorbers

Resonant Mechanism Discovery Could Inspire Ultra-Thin Acoustic Absorbers

Bats exert high predation pressure on nocturnal insects, such as moths. In defence against bat echolocation, the thin layer of tiny scales on moth...
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Minimally Invasive Radical Hysterectomy May Increase Death Risk in Patients with...

A study by a multi-institutional research team, including Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) physicians, has found evidence that patients receiving minimally invasive radical hysterectomy for...
wastewater treatment, Earthquake Defences, food waste, plastic pollution, Breast Cancer, renewable resources, energy self-sufficient, cancer, Infectious Disease in Dogs, Printed Solar Cell, chronic diseases, Radical Aircraft Engine, Infrared Sensor, Mummifying, bacterial and viral infection, steel waste gases, Hydrogen-Powered Mobility, Gene cluster identification, Equipment Waste, plant cells, biodegradable materials, climate change, biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

An Eco-Friendly, Low-Cost Solution to Wastewater Treatment

According to United Nations estimates, two thirds of the world’s population could be living under water-stressed conditions by 2025. This pressure on the quantity...

Anisotropic Conductive Film

New Anisotropic Conductive Film for Ultra-Fine Pitch Assembly Applications

Higher resolution display electronic devices increasingly needs ultra-fine pitch assemblies. On that account, display driver interconnection technology has become a major challenge for upscaling...

Chronically anxiousvideo

Chronically Anxious? Deep Sleep May Take the Edge off

Extreme angst is on the rise nationally and globally, especially among teens and millennials. Among other factors, preliminary findings from UC Berkeley sleep researchers...
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New Deep Knowledge AI System Could Resolve Bottlenecks in Drug Research

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the...
Arthritisvideo

Stopping Arthritis Before It Starts

When you think of motion capture technology, you might think of the movie magic that brought Jurassic World to life or made Avatar a box office hit. But that’s...
Warfighter Technology

I²C Firm RadioBro Wins First Place in Warfighter Technology Contest

A small business at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Dorothy S. Davidson Invention to Innovation Center (I²C) has won a $10,000 first...
catalysts

Replicating Surfaces, in Extreme Detail

Yale researchers have developed a procedure that can replicate surface structures at the atomic scale - a breakthrough that could lead to better catalysts,...
Parkinson’s diseasevideo

Singing May Reduce Stress, Improve Motor Function for People with Parkinson’s Disease

Singing may provide benefits beyond improving respiratory and swallow control in people with Parkinson’s disease, according to new data from Iowa State University researchers. The...
Digital World

Ringling Train Chugs into Digital World

The century-old train car known to be the site of business transactions for the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus has long been...
batteries

Next-Gen Batteries Possible with New Engineering Approach

Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy. The researchers developed a...
twist DNA

Physicists Unravel the Mechanics of DNA

The DNA within our cells is an almost two-metre string of information, stored in a nucleus of only a few micrometres large. The information within those...

New Records for Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells Through Improved Light...

perovskite silicon tandem solar cells
Using microstructured layers, an HZB team was able to increase the efficiency of perovskite silicon tandem solar cells to currently 25.5 percent, the highest...

Ultrathin Transparent Silver Layers for Solar Cells

solar cells
Researchers at the Ruhr University Bochum and the Bergische Universität Wuppertal have developed a new production method for transparent, wafer-thin silver layers. The material could...

Extending the Life of Low-Cost, Compact, Lightweight Batteries

batteries
Metal-air batteries are one of the lightest and most compact types of batteries available, but they can have a major limitation: When not in...