Thursday, April 26, 2018
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Permeable capsulevideo

Permeable Capsule Could Be Packed with Cells That Fight Cancer

Researchers at KTH report that after six years of work, they have produced microparticles with encapsulated cells which passed some of the key challenges that need...
neuronal network simulator

Breakthrough Paves Way for Simulations of Large Parts of the Brain

The future of supercomputing promises immense resources for technologies such as the neuronal network simulator, NEST. The challenge today is to work out how...
Hydrogen Extraction

Hydrogen Extraction Breakthrough Could Be Game-Changer

Precious metals are the standard catalyst material used for extracting hydrogen from water. The problem is these materials - such as platinum, ruthenium and...
Alzheimer’s

Model for Producing Brain’s “Helper Cells” Could Lead to Treatments for...

Star shaped cells that are found in the brain and spine, astrocytes were long thought to be the “glue” that binds nerve cells; but...
video

Wave Energy Device Tests Begin in North Atlantic

Inspired by the mechanics of the human heart, a new type of wave energy conversion system developed in Sweden is now bobbing in the...
DNA wire biosensors

Technique Produces Powerful DNA Wire Biosensors

While DNA nanowires have been in development for some time, the method developed at KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University produces a unique three-dimensional...
cancer cells

Precision Nanomaterials May Pave New Way to Selectively Kill Cancer Cells,...

Dendrimers – or cascade molecules – are organically synthesized large molecules that match nature's peptides and proteins with respect to size and structure. Researchers...
spider silk

New Way to Form Bioactive Spider Silk for Medical Use

A technique reported today in Advanced Materials offers a promising alternative to experimental silk forming methods that rely on harsh chemicals, says Associate Professor My...
human protein

Chan Zuckerberg Initiative Teams up with Swedish Researchers to Map All...

The project has been made possible in part by a grant from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative donor advised fund, an advised fund of Silicon...
metabolic disorder

First-ever Look at Potentially Deadly Metabolic Disorder That Strikes Infants

You may have never heard of congenital disorder of glycosylation, but parents whose children are born with forms of this rare – and underreported...
quantum dots

Researchers Are One Step Closer to Making Integrated Quantum Optical Circuits...

The group, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, has managed to create the building blocks of such a system by integrating artificial atoms (quantum...
liver cancer

Study Offers New Targets for Drugs Against Fatty Liver Disease and...

A team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology’s Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) research center and Gothenburg University employed the biological networks generated for...
cancer

Cancer Survival Tied to Protein Levels

Led by KTH Professor Mathias Uhlén, a team from the Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab) hope to open a new path to personalized cancer...
cancer treatment

Unique Pathology Atlas Paves the Way for Personalised Cancer Treatment

The atlas project has been led by Professor Mathias Uhlén, SciLifeLab, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, in cooperation with colleagues from Uppsala University and...
crab nebula

New Observations Reveal Crab Nebula’s Polarised Emissions for First Time

The researchers' observations of polarised X-rays from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar, published today in Scientific Reports, may help explain sudden flares in the...
nanosensor

Low-cost CO Sensor Developed Using Nanoscale Honeycomb Structures

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have developed a highly sensitive, low-cost nanosensor that can quickly detect minute changes in carbon monoxide (CO) levels,...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

New Method Shortcut in Drug Development

“Finding out how a therapeutic drug affects the body means having to consider many different factors that can influence the cells’ internal environment. Our...
cancer

Mistaken Antibodies May Have Led Cancer Research down a 20-year Dead...

The study questions whether reliance on insufficiently-validated antibodies has led science down a dead-end path since the discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ESR2) in...
spider silk

Strongest Artificial Spider Silk Synthesized with Cellulose from Wood

Published in American Chemical Society Nano by researchers from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, the technique brings together the structural and mechanical performance...
flu

New Flu Test Easy as Breathing, with Faster Results

A method for diagnosing flu virus from breath samples could soon replace invasive nasal swabs and deliver better results faster. There’s a short window for...