Monday, November 12, 2018
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Deforestation

Carbon Reserves in Central American Soils Still Affected by Ancient Mayan...

Deforestation is suspected to have contributed to the mysterious collapse of Mayan civilization more than 1,000 years ago. A new study shows that the...
climate change

Ever-Increasing CO2 Levels Could Take Us Back to the Tropical Climate...

As seen from the ongoing heat wave, the knock-on effects of such extreme warmth include arid land and fires as well as impacts on...
global warming

Global Warming May Be Twice What Climate Models Predict

Future global warming may eventually be twice as warm as projected by climate models and sea levels may rise six metres or more even...
Great Barrier Reef

Rise and Fall of the Great Barrier Reef over 30,000 Years

An international study led by Associate Professor Jody Webster has shown the reef is resilient to major environmental changes but is highly sensitive to...
ice age

A Switch in Ocean Circulation That Helped End the Ice Age

Changes in the circulation of the North Pacific Ocean about 15,000 years ago released large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, helping warm the...
Ocean Nitrogen

Tiny Microenvironments Hold Clues to Ocean Nitrogen Cycle

Nitrogen is essential to marine life and cycles throughout the ocean in a delicately balanced system. Living organisms—especially marine plants called phytoplankton—require nitrogen in...
earthquakes

Shaking up Megathrust Earthquakes with Slow Slip and Fluid Drainage

While the drainage of fluids during megathrust earthquakes has been thought to occur when the megathrusts open up new pathways for fluid drainage through...
Greenhouse Effect

First Direct Observations of Methane’s Increasing Greenhouse Effect at the Earth’s...

Scientists have directly measured the increasing greenhouse effect of methane at the Earth’s surface for the first time. A research team from the U.S....
earthquake

Acoustic Imaging Reveals Hidden Features of Megathrust Fault off Costa Rica

Geophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth's crust collide. The...
air pollution

Manchester Researchers Identify Key to Darkness of Soot in Air Pollution

Researchers from The University of Manchester are a step closer to understanding how the darkness of atmospheric soot particles is controlled by transparent coatings...
Hydrogen Production, tidal renewable energy, Antibiotic-Free Treatment, mental disorders, cancer, Synthetic Biology Research, Parkinson’s, Turbine Technology, Chronic Lung Disease, smart technology, Water monitoring device, aircraft wing design, energy consumed, Climate Change, Rett Syndrome, Perovskite-silicon solar cell, Low Back Pain, Heart Valves Implanted, heat pump, Floating device, honeybee, Workplace with Robots, power devices, Railway Sleepers, Minor cereals, paralysed, fibre optic, ultra-thin membranes, cold on a plane, diabetes genes, microcapsules, Electromagnetic radiation, Cold-loving bacteria, Artificial intelligence, Silicon Chips, Magnetic E-Skins, dog, climate change, Intestinal worms, antisocial behaviour, immune system, Bicarbonate, Neonatal seizures, insects, Alzheimer's disease, photovoltaic, Integrated Circuits, stress, human intelligence, quantum, OLED, smart glass, magnetic devices, mites, breathing monitor, spider silk, Cetaceans, Alzheimer, MNS robots, blindpad, photonics, remote medical diagnostic, sensors, Photovoltaic Panels, Alzheimer’s Disease, cancer, WINESENSE, combustion, multiple myeloma, sugar and mood, arctic waters, ultrawine, heliospheric, lunar exploration, Brain Diseases, fingertips, trees, earthquakes, gene therapies, climate change, nuclear waste, quantum, brain diseases, solar power, pulmonary disease, solidification, global warming, photovoltaic cells, drone, antiobiotic-resistant bacteria, Graphene, energy efficiency, magnetic data storage, immunology, Genetic plant, Antarctic, Alzheimer, Magnetic attraction, Huntington’s disease, bone repair, earthquakes, photonic crystals, brain, immunodeficiency, Internet of Things, spinal cord injuries, Dietary restriction, Bacterial DNA, NEUROMICS, huntington's

Major Earthquakes May Be Caused by the Moon

The study, published in the journal ‘Nature Geoscience’ and conducted by a team from the University of Tokyo, argues that the same gravitational influence...
climate

How Meltwater from the Ice Sheets Disturbed the Climate 10,000 Years...

How will the melting of ice in Greenland affect our climate? In order to gain an idea how that process might look like, researchers...
brain tumours, Common drugs, diabetes, chronic wounds, magnetism, intestinal tumours, molecular scissors, disease, genetic, immune cells, drug development, Diabetes, Antibiotic, hydrogen generation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, malaria, photosynthesis, kidney failure, Brain tumours, mental health, blood cancer, cancer, dementia, cancer treatment, antibiotic resistance, blood vessel leakage, quantum simulations, atrial fibrillation, batteries, goiter treatment, terahertz radiation, organic materials , Guild of European Research Intensive Universities, gene copies, social anxiety, blue light screens, ‘Our hope is that these findings will make it possible to discover a way to selectively inhibit the TGF-beta signals that stimulate tumour development without knocking out the signals that inhibit tumour development, and that this can eventually be used in the fight against cancer,’ says Eleftheria Vasilaki, postdoctoral researcher at Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University and lead author of the study. TGF-beta regulates cell growth and specialisation, in particular during foetal development. In the context of tumour development, TGF-beta has a complicated role. Initially, it inhibits tumour formation because it inhibits cell division and stimulates cell death. At a late stage of tumour development, however, TGF-beta stimulates proliferation and metastasis of tumour cells and thereby accelerates tumour formation. TGF-beta’s signalling mechanisms and role in tumour development have been studied at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at Uppsala University for the past 30 years. Recent discoveries at the Institute, now published in the current study in Science Signaling, explain part of the mechanism by which TGF-beta switches from suppressing to enhancing tumour development. Uppsala researchers, in collaboration with a Japanese research team, discovered that TGF-beta along with the oncoprotein Ras, which is often activated in tumours, affects members of the p53 family. The p53 protein plays a key role in regulating tumour development and is often altered – mutated – in tumours. TGF-beta and Ras suppress the effect of mutated p53, thereby enhancing the effect of another member of the p53 family, namely delta-Np63, which in turn stimulates tumour development and metastasis.

Climate change affects how organic materials are decomposed 

A new study by researchers at Uppsala University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences shows that the decomposition of organic materials in lakes,...
Fertilizer’s legacy

Fertilizer’s legacy: taking a toll on land and water

For the first time, an international group of scientists, has come up with a way to estimate on a large scale how phosphorus flows...
video

Double Dose of Bad Earthquake News

Researchers find that earthquakes on thrust faults can spread 10 times farther to a second nearby thrust fault than previously thought
drought

Severe droughts no longer caused just by nature

A group of key water researchers from 13 organisations in eight countries, including the University of Bristol and Cabot Institute, is calling for a...
small ponds

Small ponds produce an outsized share of greenhouse gases

Tiny ponds play a disproportionately large role in global greenhouse gas emissions from inland waters, according to a new study by Yale’s School of...