Thursday, May 24, 2018
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plant cells

A Jigsaw Puzzle of Plant Cells

Plant cells are under tremendous pressure. To prevent themselves from bursting, plants had to come up with something unique: According to scientists from the...
Prenatal Stress

Child Development Experts Discover Potential Upside to Prenatal Stress

Prenatal stress might not be so bad for babies after all, depending on how they are raised. New research with prairie voles by child development...
batteries

Using Crumpled Graphene Balls to Make Better Batteries

Lithium metal-based batteries have the potential to turn the battery industry upside down. With the theoretically ultra-high capacity of lithium metal used by itself,...
crops

Root Discovery May Lead to Crops That Need Less Fertilizer

Bean plants that suppress secondary root growth in favor of boosting primary root growth forage greater soil volume to acquire phosphorus, according to Penn...
asthma

Mould Discovery in Lungs Paves Way for Helping Hard to Treat...

A team at The University of Manchester have found that in a minority of patients they studied, the standard treatment for asthma - oral...
drug abusers

Gratitude Helps Drug Abusers Better Cope with Stress and Challenges

People who feel a sense of gratitude tend to be happier, healthier and better in dealing with stress. Two psychologists from the National University...
earthquakes

Pressure Points for Human-Induced Earthquakes

Observations of induced earthquakes inspired KAUST researchers to develop a physics-based rupture model to determine the conditions most likely to cause large earthquakes. Potentially...
Dengue Virus

Dengue Takes Low and Slow Approach to Replication

A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body’s normal defenses. Duke researchers report...
ceramics

White Graphene Makes Ceramics Multifunctional

A little hBN in ceramics could give them outstanding properties, according to a Rice University scientist. Rouzbeh Shahsavari, an assistant professor of civil and environmental...
noise pollutionvideo

Noise Pollution Causes Chronic Stress in Birds, Hindering Reproduction

Birds exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations show physiological signs of chronic stress and—in some cases—have chicks whose growth is stunted,...
Sugar Shortage

Survival Strategy of Messenger RNAs During Cellular Sugar Shortage

If a cell encounters a stress situation, whether it is due to nutrient restriction or osmotic shock, the cell reacts immediately to ensure its...
beta blocker

Beta Blockers May Boost Immunotherapy, Help Melanoma Patients Live Longer

A common, inexpensive drug that is used to prevent heart attacks and lower blood pressure may also help melanoma patients live longer, according to...
Crohn’s disease

Dysfunctional Gene May Be Culprit in Some Crohn’s Disease Cases

Researchers on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are studying how immune cells adapt as they enter different tissues—with the goal...
internet of thing

Device Connects Non-Automated Machines to the Internet

The Brazilian firm DEV Tecnologia is only four years old, yet it already stands out in an increasingly important sector: the Internet of Things...
hormone

Scientists Create Molecule of Love with Fewer Complications

A new and improved version of the ‘love hormone’ oxytocin has been developed by an international collaboration of scientists, including members of staff from...
Postpartum depression

Neuroscientists Shed Light on Causes of Postpartum Depression Using New Research...

Postpartum depression strikes nearly one in five new mothers, who may experience anxiety, severe fatigue, inability to bond with their children and suicidal thoughts....
ecological hypothesis

A Classic Darwinian Ecological Hypothesis Holds up—with a Twist

A long-held hypothesis about the factors that govern species ranges largely holds true, but may be the result of a previously underappreciated ecological mechanism,...
Heart Disease, Hybrid Donor-Acceptor Polymer Particles, skin damage, aging, Post-Traumatic Stress, Diabetes, body on a chip, smoking, lupus, dementia, digestive system, Head Impact, blood pressure, Pancreatic Cancer, Regenerative Medicine Therapies, Cardiometabolic Health, Kidney Function, Cocaine addiction, Opioid Analgesic, Asthma, Antidepressants, breast cancer

Noninvasive Brainwave Technology Improved Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Military Personnel

A noninvasive brainwave mirroring technology significantly reduced symptoms of post-traumatic stress in military personnel in a pilot study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical...
biomedical devices, Stretchable Smart Sensor, brain cells, interstitium, Mediterranean diet, Bat DNA, graphene, global warming, infectious disease, INTEGRA , cancer, Huntington, man flu, black hole, Carbon dioxide, genes, Alzheimer, Brain-computer interfaces, graphene, immune system, topology, climate change, Twin Embryos, blue brain, climate change, human genome, mature B cell neoplasia, artificial iris, autonomous robot, chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

Yeast Study Links Sugar to Growth of Cancer Cells

Yeasts are a diverse group of unicellular organisms representing great untapped potential for developments in both the food and healthcare sector. There are more...
Parkinsonvideo

Laser Shoes Prevent ‘Freezing’ in Parkinson Patients Clear Reduction in Symptoms

Walking problems are common and very disabling in Parkinson’s disease. In particular, freezing of gait is a severe symptom which generally develops in more...