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Exhausted Immune Cells Linked to Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Adelaide researchers have for the first time discovered that a specific type of irritable bowel syndrome is associated with exhaustion of the immune system...
diabetes, brain cell, dinosaurs, gut bacteria, bandwidth, forest loss, supercomputer, Zealandia, marine ecosystems, ultrafast X-ray, Ant Navigation, Huntington’s disease, carbon dioxide, wind turbine, Alzheimer’s, climate, flu, body clock, joint pain, hurricane

Finnish Study Reveals Link Between Unemployment and Diabetes

Research, partly supported by the EU-funded DYNAHEALTH project, established that, in the men involved, pre-diabetes was found in 19.2% of those employed, 23.0% who’d...
Earthquakes

Japanese Slow Earthquakes Could Shed Light on Tsunami Generation

Understanding slow-slip earthquakes in subduction zone areas may help researchers understand large earthquakes and the creation of tsunamis, according to an international team of...
chemotherapy, tidal energy, Nanomedicine, ecosystem, Mycotoxins, obesity, methylisation, deep drilling, brain scans, volcanic gas, biocatalyst enzymes, earthquakes, detectors, robotics, asthma sufferers, infrastructure, olive trees, solar energy, satellites, olive oil, robotic arms, zika virus, locked-in state, digital detox, climate change, climate, stroke, The new production method was developed by engineers at the University of Exeter. It consists in creating entire device arrays directly on the copper substrates used for the commercial production of graphene, after which complete and fully-functional devices can be transferred to a substrate of choice. This process has been demonstrated by producing a flexible and completely transparent graphene oxide-based humidity sensor. Not only does this device outperform currently-available commercial sensors, but it’s also cheap and easy to produce using common wafer-scale or roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques. ‘The conventional way of producing devices using graphene can be time-consuming, intricate and expensive and involves many process steps including graphene growth, film transfer, lithographic patterning and metal contact deposition,’ explains Prof David Wright from Exeter's Engineering department. ‘Our new approach is much simpler and has the very real potential to open up the use of cheap-to-produce graphene devices for a host of important applications from gas and bio-medical sensors to touch-screen displays.’ One of team’s main objectives was to increase the range of surfaces that graphene devices can be put on. Whilst the demonstrated humidity sensor was integrated in a plasdinosaur, dieting, coral, dengue epidemics, vaccines, thermal energy, artificial intelligence, Cloudlightning, Memristors, Sensory Tool, HIV, autonomous robot, offshore renewable energy, Wearable robots, processors, Artificial, climate, plasmons, Antarctica’s ice, cryogenic preservation

New Data Shows Chemotherapy Used for Brain Tumours May Cause Depression

Funding for the MECPST-IPD project to Dr Martin Egeland, at Kings College London, UK, supported research into the impact of the drug temozolomide on...
human genome

Short Regulatory Gene Spotted

An epigenetic mechanism regulating gene activity has been revealed by a KAUST-led international team of researchers investigating interactions between the human genome and its...
Concussion Effects

Concussion Effects Detailed on Microscopic Level

New research has uncovered details about subcellular-level changes in the brain after concussion that could one day lead to improved treatment. Researchers at The Ohio...
Glioblastomas

Is It Possible to Reduce Resistance to Chemotherapy?

Glioblastomas (GBMs) are considered to be the most malignant and dangerous form of brain tumours. The primary form of treatment of these is chemotherapy,...
wearable stress-monitoring device

Leti Announces Two New Tools for Improving Transportation Comfort, Safety and...

Wearable Device Measures Stress Responses for Travelers, Pilots and Truck Drivers,  While Smartphone App Provides Transit Agencies Broad Data on Transport Modes The non-invasive, stress monitor...
stress

Why Stress Is Causing the Nation a Pain in the Gut

With more than 20 per cent of the Australian population suffering from a FGID, which includes Irritable Bowel Syndrome and symptoms such as constipation,...
endocannabinoids

A New Approach to Combatting Anxiety States, Pain and Inflammation

Endocannabinoids are substances similar to fatty acids which are produced by the body. They activate specific cannabinoid receptors and among other things can exert...
hydrogen fuel cells, Parkinson’s disease, sleep apnea, parasitic worms, melanoma, climate, wastewater

Mild-to-moderate Obstructive Sleep Apnea Associated with Hypertension, Diabetes

Penn State College of Medicine’s Dr. Alexndros N. Vgontzas, professor of psychiatry, and Dr. Yun Li, postdoctoral scholar, are presenting research at this week’s...
Meteorite

High-pressure Experiments Solve Meteorite Mystery

With high-pressure experiments at DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III and other facilities, a research team around Leonid Dubrovinsky from the University of Bayreuth...
superelastic alloy

The UPV/EHU Develops the First Nanometrically-sized Superelastic Alloy

UPV/EHU researchers have explored superelasticity properties on a nanometric scale based on shearing an alloy's pillars down to nanometric size. In the article published...
coral bleaching

Fixing the Role of Nitrogen in Coral Bleaching

Excess nitrogen is shown to disrupt coral-algae symbiosis, triggering bleaching even in the absence of heat and light stress. With coral bleaching events intensifying...
gecko

Gecko-inspired Multipurpose Gripper

Robots generally need a gripper that adapts to three-dimensional surfaces. Such a gripper needs to be soft to adapt to a great variety of...
hypothalamus

‘Shocking’ New Research Finds Friendships Are Key to Good Health

University of Virginia researchers have for the first time revealed brain imaging evidence that supports what experts have long hypothesized: that people with strong...
foraminiferavideo

Tiny Shells Indicate Big Changes to Global Carbon Cycle

Experiments with tiny, shelled organisms in the ocean suggest big changes to the global carbon cycle are underway, according to a study from the...
Power-Generating Clothes

Off-the-Shelf, Power-Generating Clothes Are Almost Here

A lightweight, comfortable jacket that can generate the power to light up a jogger at night may sound futuristic, but materials scientist Trisha Andrew...
catalyst

Stanford Scientists Use Nanotechnology to Boost the Performance of a Key...

A tiny amount of squeezing or stretching can produce a big boost in catalytic performance, according to a new study led by scientists at...
solar cell

Unexpected Property May Raise Material’s Prospects as Solar Cell

Crystalline materials known as perovskites could become the next superstars of solar cells. Over the past few years, researchers have demonstrated that a special...